Twice in One Day!

NQuisitiveBlondeFebruary 14, 2014

Hello,

Its me again.

I've got to make a final decision on flooring and I'd love some input.

My current floors are mid-to-bottom-of-the-line laminate floors and, because of a burst pipe, I've got to replace about 600 sq ft of flooring in my modest house. I've got two large dogs and probably will attempt to sell the house in the next 1-2 years.

My first inclination was to go with Pergo XP because I've got dogs; my concern, however, is that I've had moisture problems in the house since I moved in and I know that Pergo floors are subject to puckering with minimal exposure to moisture. I also just don't like the laminate flooring. I'm just tired of it.

My next inclination -- and where I'm at now -- is to do engineered click-lock "hardwoods." I've done a fair --read EXCESSIVE--amount of research and, from what I can tell, what I've picked out is durable and has consistently good reviews. Its a maple flooring. My concern, however, is with dogs that the floor will die a slow death from scratches. My solution for this is going to have area rugs over the flooring.

I'm not inclined to use tile; I do not live in an area where tile floors--outside of bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry rooms--are common and I just don't like the feel underfoot.

What if I just paint my concrete slab?!

Hoping for thoughts.

-NQ

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annkh_nd

I have hardwood floors, and big dogs. After 15 years, my floors have a lot of scratches, but not from the dogs. I trim their nails at least once a week - or whenever I can hear them clickity-clack on the floor.

I'm not sure engineered hardwood would be any more moisture-resistant than laminate. Where is the moisture coming from, and how can you solve that problem? Get rid of the moisture, and you can use whatever flooring you like.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2014 at 5:35PM
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benjesbride

I have one 75 pound dog and after six years our Bruce engineered hardwood floors look absolutely awful. Of all the home improvements we've done over the years, engineered hardwood is our greatest regret.

We installed it as floating. The edges of the planks are worn and chipped; worn in a high traffic area at bottom of stairs and chipped because I think his claws get caught on the grooves between planks? If you look at the floor at the proper angle you can see moisture around the sink, dishwasher, and fridge water dispenser has caused some wrinkling.

In our new house that we're renovating, it'll be laminate or vinyl wood-look floors. My friends have site-finished hardwoods and those look great and stand up to kids and pets, but engineered hardwood? I strongly advise against it.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2014 at 11:33PM
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cindywhitall

I love the new tile that looks like wood. Put some throw rugs on it. The potential buyers may like the durability. It might be pricey though.

    Bookmark   February 15, 2014 at 2:32PM
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rantontoo

Consider staining the concrete slab instead of painting!

    Bookmark   February 15, 2014 at 10:10PM
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Mags438

We have the original, nailed down wood flooring and have always had large dogs (> 100 lbs). I'm not very good about trimming nails (but I should be more diligent). Overall, thru the years, no scratching from dogs, more from debris from outside. About 20 years ago, we had 1st floor refinished and poly'd. Will have refinished after a remodel completed, but more because of a water stain than dog's nails.

I don't know much about engineered flooring. Is it poly finished? That might be the difference

    Bookmark   February 16, 2014 at 8:09PM
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MrsBarlow

I realize that you're probably done with this thread, but I wanted to add a suggestion.

We have two dogs and have decided to go with strand bamboo. It's amazingly hard. I hit the sample board with a hammer to test the hardness. Plus, the color was achieved by cooking the wood, so the color goes all the way through. If the dogs manage to scratch it, we won't need to touch up the color.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 1:34PM
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snookums2

Bamboo is also problematic.

Scratching problems can also be a finish issue.

Fake floors are not worth it. Good old fashioned wood wears better, acquires patina not damage and can be refinished if necessary. And it doesn't look or sound cheap under foot.

This post was edited by snookums2 on Tue, Mar 18, 14 at 17:14

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 2:52PM
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Fori is not pleased

Why not paint the slab and save the money to install flooring right before putting it on the market? (Or sooner if you hate the slab.)

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 10:57AM
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