Radon Test

jnh004April 22, 2011

We closed today on our second home. Our first home was new construction, our second is 26 years old. We've never thought twice about a radon test until today. Do you all think that is something that we should have done? It is a one story ranch on a slab foundation in coastal GA. I don't know if Radon is more prominent in certain places? I honestly don't know much about it at all! Any help is much appreciated!

TIA!

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berniek

The GA coastal region is in Zone 3, probably very low readings. If you want to test it yourself, it's not expensive to get canisters.

http://www.epa.gov/radon/

Here is a link that might be useful: Radon Map

    Bookmark   April 23, 2011 at 12:15PM
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steveinjersey

Radon is a very dense gas, and tends to accumulate in basements because they are usually less well ventilated. For this reason, Radon testing usually is done only in basements.
If your house is built on a slab - above grade, and has good ventilation, you probably have no need to worry.

    Bookmark   April 24, 2011 at 2:54PM
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LoveInTheHouse

I think radon testing is the newest scam someone came up with to wring some more money out of buyers and sellers.

    Bookmark   April 24, 2011 at 10:43PM
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maurenemm

We did have a radon test before we purchased our current house as radon was kind of a common problem in our area. The radon levels were high and we had the sellers pay for a unit to circulate the air. I don't think it is a scam.

But, I agree with steve...if you don't have a basement, I don't see a need to test.

    Bookmark   April 25, 2011 at 8:19AM
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logic

Radon tests are conducted in the lowest possible living space. If there is no basement, the test is done in the house itself. It is incorrect to assume that if a house has no basement, the radon level will always be below 4.00.
Radon levels also fluctuate, and areas that are known to be low in radon can have high readings, and vice versa.

It is very inexpensive to test. Better safe than sorry.

Here is a link that might be useful: EPA: A Citizens Guide to Radon

    Bookmark   April 25, 2011 at 1:34PM
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dreamgarden

We bought a house that tested positive for radon (6.0 pCi/L). We plan to have it mitigated in the near future. In the meantime we wanted to see if the reading fluctuates so we ordered a radon detector. It plugs into a standard household wall outlet and allows you to continuously monitor your home for radon gas. You can easily move the detector to different floors and areas, or even test another home.

It can be left on 24/7, all year around. We want to be able to see if the mitigation works as it should. We plan to loan it to our neighbor after we see how well it works for us.

Safety Siren Pro Series 3 Electronic Radon Gas Detector with LED Digital Readout:

"Rated #1 Digital Readout Meter for Radon Testing by a Leading National Consumer Advocacy Group. This product is Made in the USA!

Evaluated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Meets and exceeds required performance criteria to accurately and precisely measure radon.

The Digital LED Display Radon Detector can be used for both Short and Long Term Tests. An alarm will sound when Radon Levels reach 4.0 pCi/L or higher. (This level is stated to be unsafe by the EPA)."

A link that might be useful:

www.4radon.com/ssradeforinu.html

    Bookmark   April 30, 2011 at 11:13AM
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sschriver1_yahoo_com

I definitely think it is a scam.

Colorado is supposed to be one of the states with the higher levels of radon in the soil, but if you go to the CDC website and look at rates of lung cancer by state, Colorado shows as being one of the states with the lowest incidences of lung cancer.

We live near Boulder, and we tested our 1916 house basement for radon. It tested at between 5.8 and 7.0 in various parts of the basement. We used one of those plug in testers that work continuously.

We were having trouble finding anyone from a mitigation service to come to our house because we only have a foot and a half clearance in our crawl space area and none of them wanted to work with it.

I spoke with a contractor to see if he could help and he rolled his eyes at me. He told me to take my tester outside away from the house and measure the outside. He said I will never be able to get it lower in the house than it is outside and that the whole radon thing is just a scam to keep research money coming in to the WHO.

We measured it outside. Our tester requires being in one spot for at least 48 hours and it must be raised at least two feet above the ground. We didn't put it near a fence or anything that might hold in radon.

Our tester measured our outside levels at 6.4.

So, really, how would they even plan on getting our house inside below 4?

But, again, after seeing Colorado has one of the lowest lung cancer rates in America, and, gee, I don't think the soil has changed that much in the past few years, I'm inclined to think it is all a scam, too.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2011 at 5:46PM
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badgergrrl

Of course it's going to measure lower OUTSIDE, part of the reason it is more dangerous inside is because it builds up, as it is unable to dissipate - similar to car emissions inside of a closed garage.

Colorado is also routinely rated as one of the healthiest states in the nation in terms of body weight, exercise and general habits. I think that any radon cases may be offset by that. Also, given the fact that people tend to stay in houses less longer than they used to may also contribute to lowered effect. If you don't plan on staying in your home for decades, it's probably nothing to worry about. Probably.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 10:53AM
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logic

Our house test at 9. Radon mitigation lowered it to just above zero. People need to research the topic t make informed decisions. IMO, why would anyone want to breath in more radon than necessary?

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 3:34PM
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