A little algae revisited

dalehilemanAugust 20, 2010

Wondering whether a greenish tinge necessarily indicates live algae

For over a decade we maintained our big ingrond pool using only tabs and a weekly application of supermarket algi-clari which kept it clear and swimmable though slightly green

After a pump failure when it turned dark green--obviously an algae attack--we applied massive amounts of various chemicals including algicide, then replaced 2/3 of the water before resuming our usual maintenance whereupon it was again clear and inviting though still somewhat greenish

So we're speculating whether this tint might owe to some residual effect other than live algae, perhaps harmless chlorophyl

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goyom

Dale, did you shock the hell out of it?

I had algae, yes it was green, and took the Chlorine up to 15 PPM for 12 hours.

No green tint afterward.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2010 at 4:10PM
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poolguynj

The dead algae should be vacuumed to waste 12 to 24 hours after shocking. Wall surfaces that are too high should be brushed and vacuumed out after it settles. The wait allow

Algaecide helps prevent when free chlorine isn't available to kill, Always keeping free and available chlorine ensures that any bio-badies are killed quickly. Starvation, which is what algaecide does, takes far longer.

Pools need certain additional parameters met in addition to chlorine. Alkalinity, pH, and calcium help protect pool surfaces, ensure chlorine works, keeps certain stains from occurring, etc...

We have been through this before dale. We have pointed you several times to Pool School at TFP. S**T or get off the pot.

Scott

    Bookmark   August 20, 2010 at 6:24PM
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neilaz

Depending on your pool finish a green tint may be normal. However if you are not willing to kill the algae then i point you to the last line of what poolguynj said above.

    Bookmark   August 21, 2010 at 10:26AM
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dalehileman

"Dale, did you shock the hell out of it?"

Yes goy, at at the behest of our friendly local Bill's Pool and Spa besides replacing all the filter sand we also applied large amounts of algicide, clarifier, oxidizer, sanitizer, and something called "Mustard Knock-Out." whatever that is

Subsequently however both BH and I as well as two of our swimmer guests developed skin rashes, possibly suggesting a reaction to the various chems whereupon we immediately replaced half the pool water whereafter still the greenish hue persists but subsequently no skin problems

"I had algae, yes it was green, and took the Chlorine up to 15 PPM for 12 hours....No green tint afterward."

Yes it has been suggested to this end we likewise shock with a liquid chlorinator though after the skin eruptions we're both somewhat hesitant. Perhaps I can persuade my BH to go that route but after swimming season

"Depending on your pool finish a green tint may be normal."

Thank you Neil for that tip, which I have long suspected. It's interesting to note that after some 2 years inquiry you are the first participant to offer it

Leading one to specuate The Pool Establishment needs to devise some sort of more direct method to determines whether this tint really is attributable to algae

    Bookmark   August 21, 2010 at 12:29PM
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lbridges

Quote: "Thank you Neil for that tip, which I have long suspected. It's interesting to note that after some 2 years inquiry you are the first participant to offer it

Leading one to specuate The Pool Establishment needs to devise some sort of more direct method to determines whether this tint really is attributable to algae"

I believe most of us would have assumed since you've owned the pool for several years that you would know if the green was the pool's natural color (due to plaster/lining, etc.), or due to algae.

There IS a direct method of testing to see if its algae. It's called the overnight FC loss test. You need something like the TF100 or Taylor K-2006 test kit. You use a chlorine product (bleach or liquid chlorine) to reach shock level (based on the CYA level) and test for FC at dusk. Then you test FC again at first light. If the FC level fell less than 0.5ppm overnight then the algae outbreak has been controlled.

This info would have been found if Scott's advice above had been followed.

    Bookmark   August 21, 2010 at 4:02PM
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dalehileman

"I believe most of us would have assumed since you've owned the pool for several years that you would know if the green was the pool's natural color (due to plaster/lining, etc.), or due to algae."

Thank you bridge for your observations. As the finish is white and after evidently unsuccessful massive infusions of various tricolors, dichlors, polyoxies, chlorides, and cationic polymers I wondered whether the greenish tint might owe to effect of surrounding vegetation or even whether it might be the natural hue of Apple Valley water

Also thanks to you and Scott for the suggestion to measure algae though seemingly indirect but after a rash of skin problems (no pun intended) we are somewhat hesitant to load the pool with more chemicals of any sort

However if all else fails, and no more direct kind of test is proffered we might in desperation undertake your check but after swimming season

    Bookmark   August 24, 2010 at 12:29PM
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lbridges

dalehileman,

You claim to be a retired engineer that has owned the pool for twelve years, Surely in that time frame you would have observed a "good" color.

You have asked the same questions concerning pool chemistry on at least 4 forums (maybe 5 counting this one) and received an essentially identical answer each time - that you choose dismiss.

From a guy who claims to have writing skills sufficient to assemble a 77,000 word text using only single syllable words, one might think you would know that it wasn't a pun. Unless of course you find giving people a rash to be humorous.

Along those lines, if a serious bacteriological event happens in your pool water I hope your attitude serves you and/or them well at the hospital.

I'm out of here regarding any further correspondence, as in "Don't feed the troll."

    Bookmark   August 24, 2010 at 8:05PM
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poolguynj

dale, get a pro to take care of your pool. You have proven yourself to be far too inept for a simple task like testing and balancing your pool. Does someone tie your shoelaces or do you wear loafers and Velcro strapped sneakers? Go away.

Scott

    Bookmark   August 24, 2010 at 9:02PM
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goyom

It smells like troll on this here bridge!

    Bookmark   August 24, 2010 at 9:51PM
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dalehileman

Why do I feel like Jean Valjean ..being ganged-up upon at the mercy of several Inspector Javerts

.. I'm not sure what it looked like 13 years ago when we moved in. My No. 2 Son says it was blue though I remember it a green so given no additional inputs to the contrary I naturally feared algae

Anyone upset by my posts however are cordially invited not to read them

But thanks to all the rest of you

    Bookmark   August 25, 2010 at 12:30PM
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