China hits again - drywall

punamytsikeJanuary 21, 2009

Things are getting more and more complicated when you are buying a house. Now if you are buying a house that is built after 2004 you might have to check out your drywall and make sure that your new house does not have poisonous one from China :-/

There might be silver lining for the sellers tho, if many of those houses end up not salvageable, then they will be bulldozed, meaning there are less houses for sale, less competition. That might be in the long run good news for builders as well, all those bulldozed houses need to be rebuilt, hence more construction work. But I am afraid for China it means, I do not know what anyone dears to buy from there anymore...

Here is a link that might be useful: Chinese drywall problem

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sierraeast

Thanks to President Clinton on his "historic" trip to China when in reality he brought along over fifty company reps to outsource manufacturing to China, lessening employment here in the U.S. The other "poison" from China is the loss of those jobs to Americans. This is Chinas way of saying thanks? When are we gonna get it?

    Bookmark   January 21, 2009 at 10:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dabunch

OMG, we moved into our newly built home in February of 2007. I hope it's not the case. I will check with my builder!

One of my dogs and I were really sick for the first year. I used air purifier and had the dog sit in front of it, because I was suspecting that it was from new construction. I went into every corner and vacuumed all the sawdust because I was suspecting IT making us sick. However, we weren't much better. I thought I didn't feel well because I'm getting older...I've had other homes built, but never felt sick UNTIL this one.
I had to put the dog down this past November because of being old, BUT her 2 issues were a bad back and UNCONTROLLABLE allergies. I thought her allergies got worse because of her age, which may be true, but now I wonder.
In fact, I still get up with watery eyes, stuffy nose ...

    Bookmark   January 22, 2009 at 6:28PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
steve_o

New construction almost always comes with a host of chemicals off-gassing, sometimes for months -- drywall, paint, plasticizers, construction adhesives, protective films, flooring, electrical cable insulation, etc., in addition to the new furniture/bedding/etc. people bring into a new home. Not to defend Chinese drywall unduly, but there are so many chemicals present in construction that it would be hard to point the finger accurately at the drywall at this point.

    Bookmark   January 22, 2009 at 9:52PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punamytsike

Steve, obviously Lennar knows that this is the dry wall. What ever they found after testing the dry wall and are not disclosing, must have been bad enough for them to move families out, cover that cost, their current living expenses and also remediation on the houses. As you might know, it is very hard to get large companies to pay up before law suites and court orders. This time it is happening, makes you wonder...

    Bookmark   January 23, 2009 at 7:18AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sweet_tea

Apparently it is only homes built with Chinese drywall that was shipped to the US between 2004 and 2007. There were 2 or 3 shipments to the port in Tampa FL that are known. I don't know about other parts of the USA that might have gotten this Chinese drywall. The several news stories I read are in the Tampa area and SW FL.

The houses, they say, smell either of sulfer or metallic. Also, the AC coils are corroded to the point of needing replacement. Also the electrical wiring is corroding, turning black. Some folks that lived in the homes go so sick they moved out before, clueless as to what the issue was.

The FL health department is also involved after they found out different folks/properties seemed to have similar issues with this and they are coordinating evaluation/testing as well as some builders doing it independantly.

It sounds like most homes that were built during this period did NOT have the Chinese drywall, but some did. That is the tough part...finding out those that did. It seems that all those with the bad drywall have the odor and corrosion issues.

From what I read, this is beyond allergies...it is a real issue. Seems resolution is to remove all the bad drywall, replace the corroded electrical wiring/ac coils. Not sure what they do about furniture, carpeting, drapes, clothing that has already soaked up the vapors.

Investigation is ongoing.

    Bookmark   January 23, 2009 at 10:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sweet_tea

Here is a quote from a news article. (and the link)

'....At least some drywall imported from China during the homebuilding boom years of 2004 and 2005 was made with waste materials from scrubbers on coal-fired power plants.

Those materials leak into the air as gases and combine with the moisture on an air conditioning coil to create sulfuric acid, which appears to be dissolving solder joints and copper tubing  creating leaks, blackening the coils and even causing the system to fail...'

Here is a link that might be useful: Drywall article

    Bookmark   January 23, 2009 at 10:46AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
muddypond

Here is a quote from a news article. (and the link)

'....At least some drywall imported from China during the homebuilding boom years of 2004 and 2005 was made with waste materials from scrubbers on coal-fired power plants.

The Fort Myers News Press is not my favorite newspaper. That article quotes one local individual on the scrubber bit, but it gives absolutely no information on how he arrived at that conclusion or his qualifications to do.

As far as I am concerned, the scrubber part is strictly rumor.

    Bookmark   January 28, 2009 at 8:20AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jasonmi7

"As far as I am concerned, the scrubber part is strictly rumor. "

I have no idea who the newspaper or author is, but I can assure you that fly-ash is, and has been a big component of drywall for over a decade. It's a huge, great achievement of environmentalism developed by USG. Just about all regular drywall has fly-ash as a filler material, rather than 100% gypsum.

    Bookmark   January 30, 2009 at 2:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
muddypond

Unless I don't understand the process, synthetic gypsum comes from certain types of wet scrubbers, and it is safe. It sounds more like the Chinese drywall may have been made from unscrubbed fly ash, which is pretty nasty stuff, if any part of it at all came from power plant waste. A lot of Chinese power plants don't have any scrubbers, which is why I questioned the unsubstantiated source for that story.

    Bookmark   January 30, 2009 at 2:54PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Questions for buying a home with a septic system
I just came across an interesting article about issues...
cbrooks42
What qualifies an offer as a "low ball"?
Hello! Im on the house hunting side of things now! I...
karin_2015
Do buyers prefer table & chairs or island in kitchen?
We are getting our house in order before listing it...
pinkpaula
Figuring out who is a good Real Estate Broker?
I want to explore the market right now and get out...
prairiemoon2 z6 MA
Sell Home, Go to Court Or What?
This may be the first time I have posted asking for...
ncrealestateguy
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™