Which rooms to use reverse osmosis in for a house with well water

threeapplesDecember 13, 2011

We are building a home and will be using well water. We are not sure which rooms to use the reverse osmosis system in. I hear some people use this in the kitchen, but then I also hear that you should not drink water that's essentially distilled. Should this be used for the bathrooms only? thanks.

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andy_c

Perhaps you are not aware of what RO systems are or do. In theory, yes, you could have RO water in the bathroom but that would be impractical and very expensive.

RO water is for drinking (and cooking, etc.). There is no harm in RO water. that is usually a marketing attempt done by non-RO sellers of drinking water systems.

A dedicated faucet provides an access for this water and you could send it to the fridge.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2011 at 9:58PM
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aliceinwonderland_id

There is no reason not to plumb an RO line to the bathrooms for drinking water, brushing teeth, etc. It's just small tubing, neither impractical nor expensive. It shouldn't be used for shower, toilet - just run to a dedicated RO faucet.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2011 at 11:27PM
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threeapples

Thanks to both of you. Why do you not use this in the shower, wouldn't it keep unwanted minerals out of your hair?

    Bookmark   December 14, 2011 at 9:19AM
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asolo

Andy C said..."impractical and very expensive."

Understatement, actually. An RO system sized to provide normal volume and pressure for showers or other typical household uses would be huge, complicated, and astonishingly expensive. Would also require special piping throughout the entire system. Unless there is some special requirement and you've got personal expertise and LOTS of money and room, I would encourage you to abandon this thinking.

Would suggest whole-house water softener and small RO unit for drinking-water supply otherwise.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2011 at 9:39AM
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obrionusa

R.O. was designed to drink, cook and provide ice cubes. A water softener was designed to shower with and help with mineral build up on tubs, showers and toilets. I would guess the average R.O. system will filter about 20 gallons a day.
I did hear that high end car washes rinses with R.O. water to prevent water spots.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2011 at 9:41AM
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aliceinwonderland_id

An RO system large enough to supply water for your entire house would cost thousands of dollars and require you to have expertise to operate it. It's possible, just not practical, and I would never suggest it for anyone without prior technical knowledge of RO systems (or sufficient resources to hire the appropriately knowledgeable person full time). If you are overly concerned with minerals in your hair, you could take a plastic container of RO water into the shower with you for a final rinse.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2011 at 10:49AM
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