Copper line or hose to Dishwasher

quandaryNovember 26, 2012

I'll be replacing my KitchenAid dishwasher with a new Bosch. The repairman who recommended replacing the KitchenAid mentioned that he didn't like that the incoming water line to my DW is copper, rather than a hose. Should I purchase a hose for the new DW, or is the copper line better. The plumber who installed my current DW (10 years ago) probably just used the existing line.

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homebound

It's easier to hook up with a flex line. And you have the added peace of mind that it's a new connection, not a reused compression end.

But if the copper looks good, I'd probably still use it.

One more thing, if you don't have a separate cutoff for the dishwasher, this is a good time to add one and replace the copper line at the same time.

    Bookmark   November 26, 2012 at 8:19PM
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tjdabomb

I'd stay with the copper.

    Bookmark   November 27, 2012 at 12:21AM
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lazypup

I think the repairman is just trying to con you into buying something you don't need.

Regardless of whether you use copper or plastic they both use the same type of compression fitting, connected to the same place on the machine and the used copper line is actually healthier than the new plastic line.

    Bookmark   November 27, 2012 at 6:38AM
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quandary

It's unanimous then -- I guess I'll stay with the copper line. The DW doesn't have a separate cutoff, so I'll check on adding that. Thanks for all of the responses!

    Bookmark   November 27, 2012 at 10:49AM
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brickeyee

"The DW doesn't have a separate cutoff, so I'll check on adding that."
Very simple.

Turn off water, cut line & drain, sweat in ball valve (make sure you can move the handle both on and off without hitting anything), done.

A Teflon ball seat is easier to sweat on small diameter lines (more heat tolerant).

    Bookmark   November 27, 2012 at 1:14PM
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tjdabomb

If you sweat in a shutoff valve, make sure the valve is in the "open" position when you hit it with the heat. A closed valve could/would get damaged by the heat.

    Bookmark   November 27, 2012 at 5:53PM
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quandary

Thanks for all of your responses. I will probably hire a plumber to install the shutoff valve and water line to the dishwasher. You all do make it sound simple, but I could quickly exceed my abilities and create big problems for myself.

If you have time, check my recent post regarding using my washing machine water supply for the washer, ice maker and coffee maker. If I'm going to call a plumber, I'd like to consolidate the jobs.

    Bookmark   November 28, 2012 at 2:56PM
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lazypup

I already posted a solution with an illustration...its a simple DIY

    Bookmark   December 1, 2012 at 1:40AM
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