Shark Bite Press on Fitting to seal water supply lines

DIY_DUOSeptember 3, 2011

We are doing a master bath remodel and are converting our small shower stall into a closet. We are capping off our supply lines and our first attempts at soldering failed, possibly due to water and or steam vapors. We decided to use the "Shark Bite" fittings to permanently cap off the copper pipes. I have tried to locate info on the web as to whether it is recommended to use these as a permanent solution. The feeling I get is that some plumbers don't recommend them as they feel it is work taken from them when the DIYer can perform plumbing repairs without having to solder. On the flip side, some plumbers are stating that they have used them, often when they need to do work in hard-to-reach places, and they work great. Is it that these fittings haven't yet stood the test of time and therefore no one really wants to give their stamp of approval? Thanks in advance for your feedback.

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lazypup

Quote; The feeling I get is that some plumbers don't recommend them as they feel it is work taken from them"

It would seem that some ppl think plumbers and tradesmen of all varieties just sit around the shop and wait for the phone to ring so they can jump in the truck and come running like a firemen. Tradesmen cannot afford to have ppl sitting around for even a few minutes and our work is generally scheduled months in advance. The truth of the matter is that most of the plumbers I know don't even want your medial 10 minute job that could have been done as a DIY project or done by a local handyman.

Secondly, code prohibits just cutting and capping those lines. Code does not permit any dead end lines longer than 12" so if you plan to discontinue the use of the line you need to trace back to where it ties into the main run and cut at cap it at that point.

You stated that you were unable to solder the line because of standing water or steam in the line. The solution: if there is standing water in the line, drain the line, and if in doing so you have to drain the entire house system, then that is just what you have to do.

Now in regards to sharkbite fittings....You are correct that sharkbite fitting are new to the industry and there remains a reluctance to using them, but that reluctance is not because they are new. It is because soldering is just too easy and too cheap to mess with expensive fittings.

In addition, sharkbite fittings are only marginally accepted by some local residential codes and even then they are generally not to be used in a concealed location.

I would suggest you drain the line and leave a couple faucetts open to vent off any steam pressure that might develope from residual water.

Next, cut the copper and clean it thorougly with emery cloth, then wipe the dust off with a clean dry rag and do not touch the clean surface with your finger.

Apply flux with a clean flux brush then put a cap on and apply the heat to the cap just until you see the flux begin to bubble. Pull the heat away and apply solder and you should have it sealed.

Believe me, a child can do it.

    Bookmark   September 6, 2011 at 2:27PM
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cornealus

After reading about 9000 different opinions on a dozen or more sites Re. Shark Bite connectors (numbers perhaps a bit exaggerated) (smile) I most respectfully have to say that a great deal of the replies coming from pro plumbers seem to ridicule some honest info requests and dwell more on image and hourly rates protecting rather than contributing some helpful guidance to the average DIY quarry. I should add that many of the questions and comments referred to were several yrs old. In defense of the pro's, I must say that the majority of pro responses were more positive but also, sadly many of them did not actually address the question.

I'm pretty sure the main reason forums like this were created for, and are supported by, the average non-tradesmen. I can't imagine too many journeyman plumbers rushing to this page for help whenever they encounter a routine problem.

Please excuse the long preamble but the above illustrates the frustration many of us amateurs experience when hoping for some plain, good old, simple advise.

Now, at last, I'd love a simple straightforward answer to my simple question....Can anyone tell me, (now that 'Shark Bites" have been out for a few years), can one bury them below a tiled floor with no access ??? Notwithstanding cost, are they better than 'Pax" plastic or metal fittings?? ..Thanks to all for your kind patience and any or all replies gratefully appreciated.
CORNY in S-E Ontario

    Bookmark   February 6, 2013 at 6:52PM
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aliceinwonderland_id

If you want a simple, straightforward answer to a question, it is helpful to actually ask the question. Your first post made no mention of burying fittings below a tiled floor, nor did it mention Pex. You received sound advice, then came back with a rant that had nothing to do with the advice you were just given.

Did you even read the response? What you want to do is not up to code regardless of which method you choose:
[lazypup] "Secondly, code prohibits just cutting and capping those lines. Code does not permit any dead end lines longer than 12" so if you plan to discontinue the use of the line you need to trace back to where it ties into the main run and cut at cap it at that point."

Lazypup already answered the question you posed in your first post. Perhaps he will be kind enough to come back and answer the entirely different questions you posed in your second post. However, your behavior thus far indicates that it would probably be a waste of his time.

    Bookmark   February 6, 2013 at 7:56PM
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djlandkpl

aliceinwonderland_id - The thread was hijacked by cornealus. The OP hasn't come back yet.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2013 at 6:27AM
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weedmeister

And Corne is in Canada, if that makes a code difference.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2013 at 1:28PM
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aliceinwonderland_id

djlandkpl - I missed that - thanks! I guess I should not read forums while grumpy. Hopefully the OP gets the info needed.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2013 at 2:23PM
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xedos

Plumbers don't like them AND they aren't permeant because the sealing materials in them are a rubber o ring and plastic teeth.

What happens to rubber and plastic over time?

Yep, failure.

And what happens when your plumbing fitting fails?

When you're asleep or on vacation.

    Bookmark   March 5, 2013 at 11:29PM
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