Is it normal for pipes to run directly under joists, not thru?

needinfo001July 28, 2014

Under my house the pipes are ran directly under the floor joists instead of through them.

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tjdabomb

Sure! As long as it isn't occupied space.

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 4:30PM
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bus_driver

needinfo001, how much thinking did you do before posting? If the pipes are copper, galvanized or CPVC, how could they, on a practical basis, be installed through the joists?

    Bookmark   July 28, 2014 at 9:25PM
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greg_2010

how could they, on a practical basis, be installed through the joists?
Obviously you'd cut them into 1 foot sections and install them and splice them together. Duh!
;)

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 9:50AM
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bus_driver

And that is practical?

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 2:16PM
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greg_2010

It was a joke.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2014 at 8:40AM
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lazy_gardens

Under is preferred because you aren't weakening the joists by drilling holes in them. It's also easier to repair pipes.

As long as they are supported by proper pipe hangers, and not sagging.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2014 at 8:56AM
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tjdabomb

lol@bus.

as you are building the house, you lay a joist, drill a hole, lay a joist, drill a hole.... :0

    Bookmark   July 30, 2014 at 4:37PM
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bus_driver

I suspected that it was a joke. People should think things through, especially if they are in Congress! Perhaps they will start doing that soon (joke).
Given the problems in drilling holes through joists in line and perpendicular to the joist, installing something such as PEX through joists requires oversize holes. Not low cost nor fast-- and the customer wants both of those.

This post was edited by bus_driver on Wed, Jul 30, 14 at 20:20

    Bookmark   July 30, 2014 at 4:45PM
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lee676

I don't think this is such a joke. I recently had a basement finished, which included adding a new bathroom. The plastic pipes bringing hot and cold water to the sink (not sure if it was PEX or something else) were thin and quite flexible. But they were run under the joists instead of through them (as would be required by code for electrical wires). So the otherwise flat ceiling has an 18 foot long section where the drywall is an inch lower than the surrounding drywall; the lower section is about 8" wide to accomodate the two pipes. It looks awful.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2014 at 12:24AM
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weedmeister

Electrical wires do not have to be run through holes in the joists of an unfinished basement ceiling. If big enough, they can be stapled directly. Otherwise they can be stapled to a running board nailed to the joists.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2014 at 2:19AM
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