Cookie sheets and parchment paper

aliceinmdDecember 2, 2013

In an earlier thread on bakeware -- http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/cooking/msg010233064386.html -- some folks here specified the Chicago Metallic non-coated commercial cookie sheets. Are these the ones?
http://www.chefscatalog.com/product/24353-chicago-metallic-commercial-cookie-sheet.aspx
If not, please lead me to the right ones.

Are the slightly-raised edges on the sides a problem when removing rolled or large cookies? ... Our adult daughter wants cookie sheets for Christmas, and my collection includes non-stick ones that came with our Fisher-Paykel ovens and some (seldom used) AirBake sheets, neither of which has that slightly-raised edge.

Also: How do you re-use parchment paper? -- All in the same day? All with one kind of cookie? Always with the same side up? ... I've made a lot of cookies, but have seldom used parchment until recently as my mother and her baking friends saw no need for it. Thank you for sharing your expertise!

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booberry85

I don't know about the Chicago Metallic cookie sheets. My favorites that I've had for a few years now are cheapo half sheets from Sam's Club. I think they were $6 each maybe 5-10 years ago. They are a good weight and have held up well to lots of use.

I'll use the same parchment paper, same side up, with one kind of cookie. I like to change it after. I have family members with different dietary constraints (vegans, allergies, & Celiac's) and don't want to accidentally contaminate the cookies between batches.

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 6:53AM
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arkansas_girl

Those sheets you give the link to would be awesome for anyone wanting cookie sheets. I use regular old sheet pans of that same brand, I also have those cheap Sam's club ones which are good too. I don't see an issue with sheet pans and the high sides but supposedly it's best to make cookies in a cookie sheet without the high sides. I just find that sheet pans work for multiple tasks since they do have a high side. Supposedly though, the high sides cause cookies to flatten. The cookie sheets in the link are of high quality and do not warp with higher heat. You could check and see if TJ Maxx has them...that is where I purchased my sheet pans. Pretty much two for the price of one there!

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 7:37AM
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teresa_nc7

For years I have used my Cushionaire baking sheets, both a flat sheet and a jelly roll pan and they work a treat. Recently I found another jelly roll pan at Bed, Bath, and Beyond that is the heaviest pan of this type I have ever come across. It is made by USA Pans (link below).

Re: parchment paper use - I reuse parchment paper as long as it stays clean and is not crumpled or stained. If cookies leave behind caramelized sugar, I toss it. If dinner rolls barely leave a mark, I reuse it, keeping it on the pan, and simply wiping it off of dust when I'm ready to use it again. The paper is usually only saved for about one week when I know I'm doing a lot of baking.

Teresa

Here is a link that might be useful: USA Pans, retail locations and online info

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 8:40AM
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teresa_nc7

For years I have used my Cushionaire baking sheets, both a flat sheet and a jelly roll pan and they work a treat. Recently I found another jelly roll pan at Bed, Bath, and Beyond that is the heaviest pan of this type I have ever come across. It is made by USA Pans (link below).

Re: parchment paper use - I reuse parchment paper as long as it stays clean and is not crumpled or stained. If cookies leave behind caramelized sugar, I toss it. If dinner rolls barely leave a mark, I reuse it, keeping it on the pan, and simply wiping it off of dust when I'm ready to use it again. The paper is usually only saved for about one week when I know I'm doing a lot of baking.

Teresa

Here is a link that might be useful: USA Pans, retail locations and online info

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 8:41AM
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sleevendog

My MIL insists cookie sheets have no or very low sides for even baking. Not sure her favorite brand, but she does have two that are for cookies only.
I do know, from experience, that the cooking surface is important as well.
I use restaurant quality 1/2 sheets for everything...i have two steel quarter sheets that i use for specific things. They get HOT, so good for bottom crusts...i place my fruit tarts on them as a spill-over tray, great for empanadas.
When buying anything new, especially new sheet pans, do a test once home. On a new sheet pan when you have a cookie batter or even a new muffin tin pan. Just test and bake one or two cookies, maybe put one cookie on a small bit of parchment. It you get bottom burn, raise the pan to a higher rack. Lower the temp. Our newer ovens are performing differently now. And different from one another. Just need to fuss a bit to get it right.

My oven is gas and not very even. I often use my alum round pizza pans when baking something fussy. Thin and flat, but the slightly crimped edge makes them strong. I can reach in quick and spin it for even baking. Rather than the big heavy haul-it-out-and-shift-it front to back. A good one to have in your arsenal of choices.

Parchment isn't at all necessary if you have a couple pans designated for certain things.
It can be insurance when you know something has potential to stick. Something gooey and sticky or trying a new recipe. Or when a recipe calls for it. Microscopically, an older pan, will develop many scratches...like velcro for sticky things.
It does not have multiple uses, especially at higher temps. Breaks down and starts to char.
It is really a one time use but i've re-used it without trouble. If it is still nice a fresh looking.

Here is a link that might be useful: Cooks cookie sheet review

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 8:46AM
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grainlady_ks

I prefer rimless, shiny aluminum pans for cookies (I use almost 30-year old Rema Bakeware insulated pans - invented by a friend of mine, Margaret Logan). I use rimmed pans (insulated and non-insulated) for many other things, but not cookies. In fact, I have 3 different sizes of each of these pans to accommodate different uses and recipes.

Avoid extremely thin pans because they seem to be the #1 reason for burned cookie bottoms and under-baked tops. Tip: if you already have thin pans, you can put 2 sheets together (one on top of the other and only bake on the top sheet) for added insulation if you tend to get burned cookie bottoms.

Dark nonstick pans (such as Wearever) are also popular, but not without some changes to your finished cookies. Cookies baked on dark nonstick pans can be smaller than those baked on shiny aluminum. The cookie may be more rounded, tops and bottoms more browned - especially the bottoms. Bottoms of cookies may also be harder than using shiny aluminum pans. I've judged so many cookies at fairs over the years, I can tell you which kind of pan was used for baking. To me, there IS a huge amount of difference.

Black surfaced pans bake faster because the dark color absorbs heat. The diameter of the cookies may be smaller and the cookie shape be more rounded.

Choose cookie sheets that are at least 2-inches narrower and shorter than the inside dimensions of the oven, so the heat will circulate around them. I also suggest having at least 3 identical sheets (4 is even better - especially if you have a convection oven and bake more than one sheet of cookies at a time) , so you always have a cool sheet to load, and all the sheets will bake the same since they are the same.

I nearly always line my pans with parchment paper, if for no other reason it makes clean-up so simple. There are a few cookies that are best baked on the sheet without parchment.

I bought a lifetime supply of parchment paper from a restaurant supply store, and I cut each sheet in half for my pans. I reuse it for one baking session or day of baking, especially when making cookies. Otherwise, it gets tossed into the trash when I done with a baking session.

-Grainlady

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 10:16AM
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louiseab

For cookies, I use stainless steel with only 1/4" rim on 3 sides. These are wonderful and will not burn your cookies, (unless you really overbake them). For sticky cookies I use parchment or usually silpat. I have 2 silpats, one for cookies and such and one for chicken wings and greasy stuff.

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 11:55AM
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annie1992

I use the Sam's Club half sheet pans for everything, mine are PolarWare and made in the USA. They are heavy enough that they don't warp from the heat of the oven and, as noted in another thread, I scrub them so they stay shiny. Shiny pans do a better job of baking my cookies, IMO, and the "experts" agree with that.

I use the same 6 pans to roast vegetables, make vegetable pizza, bake Texas sheet cake, make cookies and fudge, slab pies, toast bread crumbs, bake dinner rolls, jelly rolls/cake rolls, pretty much everything.

I don't care for the insulated "Air Bake" type pans, the cookies will overbake before the bottoms get done. They just don't work well for me, although I do have one that I use as an oven liner of sorts, to put under pies and casseroles to catch any drips and boil overs.

I do use parchment paper for cookies and for the cake rolls, and when baking cookies or dinner rolls I use one side, if it still looks good I'll use it again for the next pan full of cookies. If it gets soiled or sticky, I'll flip it over and use the other side, but after that, it's thrown away. I do not save parchment paper from today's baking to use another time and I've never been able to reuse parchment paper from the cakes. I also use parchment paper to line layer cake pans when baking wedding and special occasion cakes, but again, that paper cannot be saved or reused.

Annie

    Bookmark   December 3, 2013 at 8:16PM
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DPinc87

I am trying to reach GRAINLADY regarding a question on REMA bakeware. Your link does not provide an email link. Is it possible to email me so that I can ask you a question? I greatly appreciate it!
-Dawn
msudpinc@gmail.com

    Bookmark   December 30, 2013 at 2:59PM
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grainlady_ks

Dawn,

I sent you a message.

-Grainlady

    Bookmark   December 30, 2013 at 3:24PM
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