I can't throw it a Whey!

dgkritchDecember 5, 2011

Pun definitely intended!

I made homemade ricotta cheese over the weekend and now have about 4 cups of "whey" left over. The recipe used lemon juice to create the curds so is "acidified" and can't be used on plants, etc.

I need ideas for using it up. I will add some to a bread recipe, but 4 c. is a lot!

Any other ideas? I don't like it just to drink plain.

Deanna

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dcarch7

I find your pun a little cheesy :-).

dcarch

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 8:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pkramer60

Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey,
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 9:12PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
caliloo

I understand you can use it as a sort of buttermilk substitution..... maybe an Irish Soda Bread variation then freeze the product until you need it?

Alexa

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 9:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jessyf

Udderly ridiculous.

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 9:55PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dgkritch

Gee, you guys are just full of it tonight!! I guess I started it though, huh?

Thanks Alexa! I'm planning to add some to bread.
Seems it's good for your hair, compost pile, soaking grains as well. I'll probably just freeze some of the whey for use later. Hate to throw it away (NOT goin' THERE again...) when it is so full of protein.

Deanna

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 11:32PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
KatieC

You guys are so punny.

Use in smoothies?

    Bookmark   December 5, 2011 at 11:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jessyf

Deanna, we're gonna milk it for all its worth.

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 12:22AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
klseiverd

Little Miss Muffet
Sat on her tuffet
Eating her curds & whey.

Along came a spider
And sat down beside her

... and she beat the SH!! out of it with her spoon!

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 12:26AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
grainlady_ks

Word of caution using whey in yeast bread. Too much can affect the volume, symmetry, cellular structure, and texture of bread. One of the whey proteins is to blame but you can deactivate the protein by scalding the whey (and cooling) before adding it to your recipe.

I use whey drained from homemade kefir in our lemonade or limeade in the summer. It's better than Gatorade for quenching thirst and is rich in electrolites.

I add whey to water and steel-cut oats for an overnight soak (2 T. whey per cup of water). The benefits from soaking... The oatmeal will cook in 5-minutes. Soaking also allows enzymes, lactobacilli and other "friendly" organisms to break down the difficult-to-digest phytic acid in grains. I do the same thing when I use any grain for porridge (kamut, spelt, rye, teff, amaranth, corn grits...).

The link below has 18 Ways to Use Whey...

-Grainlady

Here is a link that might be useful: 18 Ways to Use Whey

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 8:32AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dgkritch

Is what I have even whey?
I heated 1% (store-bought) milk with salt, then added lemon juice. It formed ricotta curds which I scooped into cheesecloth and allowed to drip over the pan.

What is really left? Whey with lemon? Does it still have the wonderful proteins, etc.?

Would it be beneficial in 100% whole wheat bread? I grind my own wheat. I'm still struggling with getting a nice light loaf.

Deanna

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 12:17PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jazmynsmom

In my house, we call this a "dog treat." They love it!

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 12:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olga_6b

I believe what you have is not a whey strictly speaking. Real whey is a liqid fraction separated after milk fermentation. Many of wheys good components (enzymes, etc) are produced by bacteria during fermentation. Your milk was curdled by artificially added acid, not by the coversion of lactose. No bacteria growth.
Olga

    Bookmark   December 6, 2011 at 1:21PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Another kitchen science accidental experiment
The other day I made a soup with potatoes, tomatoes,...
sally2_gw
Really yummy vegan broth?
It's that time of year again. Planning for Passover....
plllog
Workday Goodies
Hi everyone, Tomorrow's workday treats will be Roast...
moonwolf_gw
What happened? Scientifically speaking...
Well, I'm hoping there may be someone here to give...
christinmk z5b eastern WA
Feels like the longest winter ever- anyone else dying for ramps?
Ok, so I can't stop thinking about ramp season. Maybe...
kiwigem
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™