black iron gas feed for stove

mclemensMarch 14, 2012

We're installing a Hearthstone natural gas direct vent heater in our log house. We have a free port on our gas meter to attach to. The new heater is on the interior of the same wall as the meter is on, but about 20 feet away. So.. straight run with just a few 90's required.

We want to run black iron pipe along the outside of our house, tucked into the groove between a couple logs for a bit of concealment. Then take a 90 right through the logs into a shutoff valve right behind the heater.

We can easily/safely construct the entire black iron pipe run and then strap it to the house. We are wondering how that last connect is done though?

If I have the male end of the 1/2" pipe (leading off to the heater) and a foot away I have a female port on the gas meter to attach to, how is that last magical made? (As tightening into the heater-run pipe would loosen the meter attachment?)

Or must you start at the meter and work your way over to the stove? In which case it seems more challenging to get it all tucked back into a log recess.

Thanks!

Mike in Alaska

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canihelpu

The last connection is with a flex line that are used for stove, dryer and fireplace connections, in comes in varies sizes and widths.each end comes with either a female or male connection after they are installed the flex line is put in between them.

    Bookmark   March 14, 2012 at 7:34PM
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lazypup

The last connection may be made with a flex line if flex lines are permitted in your jurisdiction..In my jurisdiction it must be pipe all the way to the appliance.

First, you must start at the source (meter end) and work towards the load.

You must have a drip stub on the meter end and generally another is required at the load end.

You must have a readily accessible shutoff at the fixture and you must have a union between the shutoff and the fixture.

    Bookmark   March 14, 2012 at 8:18PM
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brickeyee

"The last connection may be made with a flex line if flex lines are permitted in your jurisdiction."

Many jurisdictions have moved forward enough to allow the use of CSST for entire runs.

Other jurisdictions pride themselves on keeping costs as high as possible.

    Bookmark   March 15, 2012 at 4:01PM
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mclemens

We could run CSST here for the entire length. However it's on the outside of the house so a giant yellow run would be pretty annoying to look at right?

I understand how to work from the meter out to the load, but I wanted to do the entire new black iron run, except for that last tiny bit to the meter, then I could pressure test the new run before connecting it in. Is this silly or proper?

Do you ever see people using CSST to connect a meter to a run of black iron? Wouldn't that be appropriate here? I built the entire new run, pressure test it and then use a short piece of CSST to connect them?

Or should the last bit be done with a right/left type fitting?

I am not understanding yet what the professionals choice would be here, just to build out from the meter to the load and check for leaks with soapy water?

    Bookmark   March 16, 2012 at 3:53AM
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lazypup

Start at the meter and work towards the load. If you use the correct pipe dope and tighten the pipe joints correctly there is very little chance of a leak, but the operative word there is "Correctly" tighten the joints. To tighten a threaded pipe joint you need two pipe wrenches one to hold the fixed end steady while the second wrench turns the pipe, and when the joint is tight there should be no more than 1-1/2 threads visible.

    Bookmark   March 16, 2012 at 10:26AM
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brickeyee

If the meter also contains a regulator, the typical line pressures for gas are very low (often less than 2 PSI).

A tight joint is not all that hard to obtain.

While there are numerous complicated ways to measure gas pressure, it is often so low that a bucket of water is adequate.

You put a tube into the water until the gas stops flowing from the open end, then just measure how many inches of water was needed to stop the flow.

    Bookmark   March 16, 2012 at 10:58AM
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mclemens

Well here is what I ended up doing. I discovered the gas meter was way out of plumb when I tried first to just shoot a pipe straight up four feet. The pipe was leaning away from the house a lot.

So I took that out and used a 1"x1"x1/2"tee to start instead, this let me keep the next line plumb to the house.

See any dorky mistakes?

http://www.scopenews.com/gasp1.jpg
http://www.scopenews.com/gasp2.jpg

Thanks!
Mike in Alaska

Here is a link that might be useful:

    Bookmark   March 25, 2012 at 8:13PM
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mclemens

and here is where it enters the house

Here is a link that might be useful:

    Bookmark   March 25, 2012 at 8:15PM
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PRO
Sophie Wheeler

No drip stubs. You need to redo it. I'm thinking if you just swap the T with the elbow at the meter end and on the load end, that would be enough to be able add the drip stub without having to buy more than just a 3" nipple and caps for the stub, but I don't do this all day long for money like Lazypup does.

    Bookmark   March 26, 2012 at 3:00AM
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lazypup

It doesn't need a drip stub at the meter and he has one where it enters the bldg..so its fine.

    Bookmark   March 26, 2012 at 5:48AM
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mclemens

So it looks OK? a professional wouldn't show up and laugh?

I questioned the extra fitting at the meter end, but thought the pipe looked better going plumb as soon as possible, instead of saving a turn.

Can I spraypaint it to match the house? Is OK to spray paint over where the pipes enter the fittings?

    Bookmark   March 27, 2012 at 5:25PM
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