blind corner - Is a filler needed with inset cabinets?

lexmomof3February 9, 2013

I'm trying to decide between a lazy susan and a blind corner cabinet. I think a blind corner would work better but I don't care for the look of the filler that is typically needed. I'm planning on using inset cabinets. Is a filler needed when using inset cabinets? If so, what size?

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jakuvall

For the cabinet adjacent to the blind the rail alone(1 1/2") is adequate clearnce in most cases to work. I prefer a little more clearance when possible but never use a filler with inset cabinets.using an extended stile is seamless so looks better.

If a mechanism is used in the blind it is nice to pull it so the door has a bit more clearance (not essential though) by "pulling" the blind. In that case it is ideal to make the distance from the corner of each opening equal.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 8:30AM
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finestra

I have a blind corner on my uppers and didn't need a filler. On the lower, I did a super susan and used a bi-fold door to maintain the 90 degree angle of the corner. I store seasonal things in the upper because it is a paing to get to things on the upper shelves.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 8:58AM
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better2boutside

There are 2 factors to determining the scribe width when working with blind cabinets. Assuming there are drawers in both cabinets, how deep is the hardware you have selected. Much of the hardware out there is 1 1/4" deep, so you want to have a minimum of 1 1/2" for clearance. This is allowed for in the 1 1/2" face frame of the inset cabinets.

The other factor is if you have any decorative protrusions (ie pulling a sink base forward for instance) or if there is an appliance sticking out. Either one can be struck when a drawer is extended.

Regarding the corner blind mechanism, consider the LeMans swing out shelves. They are very nice when you cant opt for a corner lazy susan.

Here is a link that might be useful: Hafele LeMans blind corner mechanism

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 9:02AM
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live_wire_oak

I like to do an extended stile on the cabinet that will 90 degree abut the blind corner, simply because YES, with most of today's oversized hardware, you DO need to factor in some clearance. Otherwise you may find that the drawers will not open. And if you are dealing with a U configuration, you need to factor in adjustability into the equation as walls are never straight. This is where it is critical to have an experienced installer on board who can make the proper field adjustments.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 10:14AM
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lori_inthenw_gw

Not to hijack, but what is the basis for determining whether a super susan or blind corner pullout is a better option for you? Do you base it on what you plan to store there or what? I need to be thinking about this very soon. Maybe I should start a separate thread?

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 1:33PM
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lexmomof3

lori_inthenw - If you need the space, a super susan is better, IMO. For me, the layout is what makes the blind corner a better choice for me. I have an L shaped kitchen. On the short wall, I have approximately 44" from the corner to the beginning of the refrigerator cabinet. A super susan is 36" out from the wall in both directions. That leaves me 8" between the susan and the refrigerator cabinet. There isn't much you can do with 8". If I do a blind corner, I can do a 42", (24" blind in the corner, with an 18" door). I don't need the space as I have a large walk-in pantry and plenty of cabinets in the kitchen, butler pantry and large island.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 1:50PM
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GreenDesigns

The kitchen's architecture will determine if you have room for an L shaped corner cabinet. Those are always the most efficient use of corner space and always the first choice. Sometimes though, you don't have the room needed due to other restrictions on appliance placement or wall length.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 1:54PM
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lori_inthenw_gw

Thanks, Lexmom and GreenDesigns. Your examples make perfect sense and I finally"get it." I am pretty sure I have the right dimensions for the Susan option.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 4:19PM
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mamadadapaige

I also would suggest extended stile of the cabinet perpendicular to the blind corner cabinet and thus no filler is necessary. One advantage of a blind corner over a lazy susan when using inset cabinets is that it allows you to combine cabinets so you don't have the extra stiles (just 1-1/2" stiles between doors / drawers). Not sure if any cabinet companies combine a lazy susan to the cabinet next to it (if they did not sure you'd be able to get it into your house).

Just something to think of. I like the cleaner / simpler look of inset cabinets when they are combined so if I were on the fence of lazy susan vs. blind corner then this might be the deciding factor.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2013 at 4:40PM
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jakuvall

Most won't combine a corner cab, a few will.
As to efficiency- a pie cut susan takes a total of 72" of wall with each shelf around 793 sq. In for a total of 1586, a 45" blind takes 72" of wall in full overlay with a mid size Hafele lemans having 884" total for 2 shelves. Costs are comparable if talking super susan, items to be stored are similar. The blind gives the option of gaIning back 15" of drawer, an additional 200 sq in.

A diagonal susan will typically have 768.15 sq in per shelf.
A half moon insert in the blind will only have 437 sq in per shelf but costs less.
A diiner plate is a littlee over 100 sq. In. As referance.
The decIding factor is still layout.

This post was edited by jakuvall on Mon, Feb 11, 13 at 8:19

    Bookmark   February 11, 2013 at 6:56AM
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mrspete

I've decided to box in my blind corner, though it does seem wasteful:

1. Skipping the blind corner allows me to have larger drawers in the adjacent corners, and I prefer the space in drawers to space on a lazy susan. Things on a lazy susan can fall off in the back, and I find the things a bit cumbersome.

2. The lazy susan is pretty expensive.

3. I am planning ample storage space in an adjacent pantry.

I'm expecting the builder will put something underneath the countertop for support in that corner, but, in my kitchen anyway, it won't be something that provides storage.

An ideal situation would be to box in the blind corner . . . but access that space from the other side; however, that's only really possible if you have a U-shaped counter overlooking a table area.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2013 at 8:03AM
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