Beaver Creek State Park-bridge Repairs...then needs more...

juanitalMarch 29, 2008

Haven't been able to get out much this winter...so all I have is my yard and around...but today my daughter from Pittsburgh came down and took me here...the bridge was to be under repairs for 4 months...but there was a little drawback...and I didn't get a 2nd battery for my d300 so only got a few of these...Actually the time onthis was few weeks ago and had a pretty good rain...

Juanita

Nikon D300

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kentuck_8b

Very nice! The same style bridges can be found around here.

What is the round 'thing' at each end of the bridge, just above where you enter/exit the bridge, a sign?

Looks like they have cables holding the bridge in place.

Kt

    Bookmark   March 29, 2008 at 10:59PM
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juanital

The round things are markers(?) that tell about the bridge...and they had to bring in a crane to lift that end up where the tree hit near the foundation!

Juanita

    Bookmark   March 30, 2008 at 7:57AM
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joanmn

wow, that water looks like it could sweep the bridge right away!
JoanMN/FL

    Bookmark   March 30, 2008 at 12:00PM
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jemdandy

The floor rails are no longer supported by the superstructure, but by the stautions (in the stream). As you said, this bridge is under repair and hopefully someday, the floor will be tied again to the superstructure.

This style of bridge construction is old. I'm betting this bridge is over 100 years old. Several bridges of this style with I-Bar tension members have failed in Ohio, thus are being phased out or refurbished.

The main box members of the superstructure are made of flat plates and channel iron hot riveted together. This is the hallmark of this type of bridge, and is not seen in today's bridges. Also, if you examine the truss structure, there should be adjustable tension members with turn-buckles in the center of the tension rods. In the days when this style of construction was popular, there was a professional occupation called a "bridge tuner". After the bridge was roguhed in, it was his job to adjust the tension members so that each part of the bridge was carrying equalized loads. He 'tuned' the bridge much as one would tune a piano. By adjsuting the tension members, then striking them to make them ring, he could compare one memeber to another for tension. The frequency of ringing was a function of the amount of tension in the rods.

After the bridge had seen some use and settled a bit, he would return to touch up the "tune" of the bridge.

    Bookmark   April 3, 2008 at 5:41AM
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juanital

Very interesting! I'll check out those signs more clearly...It probably is at least 100.

    Bookmark   April 4, 2008 at 7:13AM
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