Losing the will to live.....

scarlett2001September 22, 2011

My latest job at the Hell House is to scrape and sand the old woodwork. Looks like it originally had oil based paint and at some point somebody painted over it with latex. The latex is peeling in many areas but the old oil base is on there really tight.

I just want to make it smooth and paint over it with white. So what is the best way to do this? There is a TON of woodwork to do.

TIA!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
graywings123

Rome wasn't built in a day, and your project isn't going to be finished this year, next year, maybe not even in 2013. That's what I keep reminding myself. I am refurbishing my windows and while doing so, I am refinishing the window frames.

There is a lot of good information on the internet on tools and techniques. At my age (60) I find that I can't do it every day, I have to give my fingers and wrist a rest, but I keep plugging along.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2011 at 9:47AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
scarlett2001

We have to get this baby ready and sold within one year and I understand about not being able to work on it every day, but time is a real factor here.

If we were going to make this our home,we would probably sand down to the wood, etc. but in this case, we have to be expedient.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2011 at 9:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Brushworks Spectacular Finishes

First of all, latex over oil is fine, so long as it's clean and dull, and fully adhered to the substrate.

Your problem is probably related to a topcoat over glossy or dirty paint, or cheap paint over oil. If you sand it and repaint it, it will most likely be pulled off by the tension caused by the new paint drying. Probably within 30 days.

You really need to get down to the coat of paint (the oil paint) that is fully adhered to the wood. Anything less is a waste of time and resources.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2011 at 4:25PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sofaspud

When I had this problem, I used a heat gun. The problem I had there besides getting burned several times :) was that I ended up damaging the underlying wood with the scraper, so I had to fill it before I repainted. It was really nice to get down to the bare wood, though. Looked VERY sharp after it was all done.

Don't go this route if you aren't sure if the old paint has lead in it. In general, you do not want to be doing any kind of removal activity like sanding or stripping if the oil-based stuff underneath has lead in it.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2011 at 5:48PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
scarlett2001

Built in 1926, very likely to have lead - so what do I do about that?

    Bookmark   September 24, 2011 at 2:14AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Christopher Nelson Wallcovering and Painting

It WILL have lead, no question about it

Here is a link that might be useful: lead

    Bookmark   September 24, 2011 at 5:27AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Brushworks Spectacular Finishes

Sanding of leaded paint is fine IF you wet sand it and flush away the water solution down the toilet.

    Bookmark   September 24, 2011 at 8:51AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lucille

Really? Do communities treat sewage for lead? I would think that intentionally disposing of lead in this manner would not be a good idea.

    Bookmark   September 25, 2011 at 6:10AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Brushworks Spectacular Finishes

Lucille,

Wet sanding is actually safer than a sander with a filter because wet sanding when done properly creates NO dust.

Read the EPA guideline from hard copy or when the broken link is fixed online.

"The key to reducing lead hazards while stabilizing flaking paint is to keep the surfaces slightly damp to avoid ingesting lead dust. Wet sanding uses special flexible sanding blocks or papers that can be rinsed in water or used along with a bottle mister. This method will generally not create enough debris to constitute hazardous waste."

Remember, you're wet sanding to dull or feather the edges, not remove the paint film. Very little pressure is used when wet sanding. You can probably wet sand an entire house of trim using less than 2 gallons of water.

    Bookmark   September 25, 2011 at 10:27AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lucille

It is not the sanding, it is flushing whatever lead waste you make into the community sewage system that I think is not a good idea.

    Bookmark   September 25, 2011 at 12:27PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Brushworks Spectacular Finishes

What would you do with it?

    Bookmark   September 25, 2011 at 2:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lucille

What kind of question is that? Just because I think a certain action is not appropriate, I should research? YOU recommended flushing, remember? Or do you still think putting lead into a community's sewage system is the way to go?

    Bookmark   September 25, 2011 at 4:09PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Christopher Nelson Wallcovering and Painting

This is the EPA'S recommendation, so don't be jumping all over the guy that is trying to help. You have a problem with that, take it up with the EPA, and good luck with that.

    Bookmark   September 26, 2011 at 4:33AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
graywings123

I think Lucille was having the same reaction that I had - disbelief. Brushwork's response seems counter-intuitive given the concern about keeping lead out of our bodies. I imagine it would go in a toxic waste landfill or at least a construction debris landfill, not into the water system.

I'm not saying Michael (Brushworks) is incorrect. I'm just very surprised.

    Bookmark   September 26, 2011 at 9:19AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Brushworks Spectacular Finishes

My suggestion was to follow EPA guideline. If anyone is irresponsible, wouldn't it be them?

They also recommend a shower following any work with sanding or scraping. The shower drain goes where the toilet drain goes. Same destination.

I would be more concerned about ingesting lead from indoor plumbing (lead soldered joints). The sewage treatment plant will do their part to keep it out of the water supply.
Thank you. :)

    Bookmark   September 26, 2011 at 10:30AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
BM Satin Impervo Waterborne discontinued. Replacement?
I went to purchase this today and discovered it had...
jellytoast
Help me find this wall paper please
Hi all. I'm new to the forum and excited to be here....
sasseeash
Living room and game room paint colors!! Help please!!
Hello everyone, I just bought my house and I need help...
fabbyar79
How to fix this problem
We bought a new home and waited the recommended year...
pg57
Advice on what to expect with exterior house painting job
I plan on getting estimates from 3 painters to paint...
spunkybelle
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™