Stationary windows around door

graywings123September 24, 2012

I am removing the paint from around the front door of my house. As I get closer and closer to the stationary windows on the sides and top, I'm trying to figure out how to proceed.

1) Were these window panes likely inserted like the sash panes, with metal triangles and thus removable? A couple of them could benefit from having the glazing compound replaced, so removing some of the panes is an option that would allow me to get in there and heat/scrape/sand.

2) For panes I would rather work around, such as the transom window, is there a heat shield of some type that I could put on the glass? I have deflectors for my heat gun, but I was wondering whether aluminum foil or something like that might help.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Clarion

The heat gun will loosen the glazing as well as the paint.

Yes, they likely have the triangles. Find them all, or risk breaking the glass when trying to remove.

Hard to avoid heating up the glazing on the transom window.

Might as well remove all the window panes and do a thorough job. Use new triangles (points) and instead of the usual glazing, use 30 year caulk.

Clean up the rabbit with sand paper and thinner. Apply caulk in the rabbit, lay the glass in, insert new points, and bed the glass in.

After it dries apply a 2nd bead of caulk around the edges. The right scraper to fair the caulking is critical, see link for example.

Don't worry about excess caulk until everything is dry. It is then easily removed with a razor to cut the edges and a glass scraper.

Prime with oil based primer, paint, all done, and better than new!

Here is a link that might be useful: Example of appropriate size caulk scraper

    Bookmark   September 24, 2012 at 8:13PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
graywings123

Why 30 year caulk in place of glazing compound? I'm not confident I can get the right look with caulk.

The caulk in these windows is inside, not outside. Does that make a difference?

    Bookmark   September 24, 2012 at 9:04PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
liriodendron

No, I wouldn't use caulk, especially anything with silicone in it.

You should use a good kind of glazing compound such as Sarco.

Are you in a cold climate? Because if so. you might want to defer until next spring as it takes a longish time (weeks in cool fall weather) for the glazing compound to dry enough to be paintable. This is a problem for fixed, built-in panes - at least with sash or storm windows, you can bring them in at night and keep them in a warm dry place to accelerate the drying as much as practical.

L.

    Bookmark   September 25, 2012 at 12:56AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Clarion

"Are you in a cold climate? Because if so. you might want to defer until next spring as it takes a longish time (weeks in cool fall weather) for the glazing compound to dry enough to be paintable."

Exactly. Hence, the 30 year caulk, which is far easier to fair than glazing compound, and will last as long as the compound, if not longer.

    Bookmark   September 25, 2012 at 5:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
graywings123

I am in Virginia. Fortunately the glazing compound is on the inside, so the dry time will not interfere with the outside work.

    Bookmark   September 26, 2012 at 1:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sombreuil_mongrel

I have always found it interesting that sidelites are just as often as not glazed from inside (as they are on my own house) as from without.
The only explanation I can come up with apart from appearance is that it's more of an impediment to the sneak thief who could (for a few years' time) carve out the soft putty silently removing a pane of glass and unlocking the door. Pity the thief who attempts that with ancient rock hard putty.
Casey

    Bookmark   September 27, 2012 at 7:45AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
White Cedar Shingles: Best price?
Hi all, My wife and I are gearing up to restore the...
dmatlosz
Weird things found in old houses
So I went on a basement rampage this weekend, donning...
ideagirl2
Told we had a slate roof--turns out...
...it's asbestos. We bought our lovely, grand 1910...
hgolightly
Strip flooring with unusual cross section
(Cross posted from Flooring forum) I'm renovating a...
ferretbee
Old-Growth Heart pine paneling -- reused as flooring?
Hi, My new 1939 colonial has a family room and foyer...
dyhgarden
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™