Exterior Side/Architecutral Detailing Questions

beth0301July 18, 2009

We are buying a 1888 Victorian home and our first order of business is to seal and finish the exterior of the home.

I should mention that the house next to it was an identical twin when built and has been restored (though over the years different owners have made different remodel decisions and they are now more like fraternal twins than identical twins).

The previous owner started to add (pardon my lack of correct terminology here) dog eared siding (shingles?) to the front and side bay windows. The house next door has them too but theirs "bell out" over each window like an eyebrow protecting the window. Ours are flat.

How do we get ours to form a "bell" shape or "eyebrow" shape so they flair out slightly over each of the four windows?

Here are pictures of ours currently - see how it's a straight vertical plane instead of a flair?

http://i413.photobucket.com/albums/pp211/beth0301_01/house/DSCN1131.jpg

http://i413.photobucket.com/albums/pp211/beth0301_01/house/DSCN1133.jpg

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kterlep

mine (1889) flare out at the bottom, I would assume there is some furring that has been installed that allows the bottom run to flare... Sorry I don't have better info...

I would think you would need to add one more run under what's already installed...

    Bookmark   July 18, 2009 at 12:19PM
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sombreuil_mongrel

There would be some shaped shims run horizontally as forms/nailers, or vertical shims and then horizontal lath run across them as a shaped sheathing. If the curves are very intense, the shingles also have to be steam-bent. On roofs where shakes are used, the effect can be more casual, but on wall shingles where all of them are resawn to the same width and thickness, the effect is very formal and has to be perfectly planned out so that the "tile pattern" aligns both on the vertical and horizontal. It's not beginner's work.
What the PO did was wrong, BTW. He used no starter course, and just stuck new halves up to the line where they had been cut off above, IOW, it will not be watertight, and will allow water into the sheathing. Maybe you already knew this, but those new shingles must come off anyway and be done right, with starter courses and woven in underneath the old shingles above the second course.
Casey

    Bookmark   July 18, 2009 at 12:45PM
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sombreuil_mongrel

There would be some shaped shims run horizontally as forms/nailers, or vertical shims and then horizontal lath run across them as a shaped sheathing. If the curves are very intense, the shingles also have to be steam-bent. On roofs where shakes are used, the effect can be more casual, but on wall shingles where all of them are resawn to the same width and thickness, the effect is very formal and has to be perfectly planned out so that the "tile pattern" aligns both on the vertical and horizontal. It's not beginner's work.
What the PO did was wrong, BTW. He used no starter course, and just stuck new halves up yo the line where they had been cut off above, IOW, it will not be watertight, and will allow water into the sheathing. Maybe you already knew this, but those new shingles must come off anyway and be done right, with starter courses and woven in underneath the old shingles above the second course.
Casey

    Bookmark   July 18, 2009 at 1:53PM
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