Anyone install an elevator in an old house?

jgoppMay 10, 2012

I'm planning on putting an elevator in a 1920s home which currently has a perfect space for one. But I'm thinking about the costs. The plan would be a four stop system from basement to attic, stopping on the floors between. I'm wondering if anyone has installed one and what the rough costs were for you. I am estimating roughly $45-80,000 in my head including the brick structure to house the elevator. But I'd like to know what you guys have done, or have seen done. Thanks.

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Billl

I'm sure that pricing for a specialty item like this is going to be incredibly regionally specific. Why not just get a couple actual quotes?

    Bookmark   May 10, 2012 at 8:41AM
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brickeyee

"I am estimating roughly $45-80,000 in my head including the brick structure to house the elevator. "

Not required.

A hydraulic elevator is often a good fit for application like this.
The only heavy support is at the bottom, and the rest is provided by the tracks to guide the cab.

Fire resistant drywall to enclose the shaft is far cheaper than trying to use any type of masonry.

Fire rules for single family residential are not nearly as onerous as for multi-family structures.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2012 at 10:52AM
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jgopp

billl: I have a few guys coming by this week to estimate the job. Just seeing if anyone here had done it before.

brick: I am actually building an addition to the side of the house to make the elevator shaft, that is where the masonry comes in.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2012 at 1:39PM
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bostonpam

I would be interested in your estimates because this is something I see us doing in the future when we age in our house. I would put the elevator interior to our house. I'm not sure where I got my guesstimate but estimated $50K.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2012 at 1:50PM
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brickeyee

Still look for hydraulic.

You would need actual masonry (multiple wyths thick, possibly with some type of cement block for at least one layer) to carry the load of hoisting gear, not just a single brick veneer layer.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2012 at 1:58PM
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liriodendron

I have planned a space for an elevator shaft running from basement to attic of my two-story, 19th c. timber frame house. I am planning to use one of the hydraulic ones that Brickeye is referring to.

At the moment the "planning" is just to leave room for one when siting the semi-permanent amenities. In this case the space on the first floor is occupied by a tub in a bathroom with a shower and on the second floor by a large, walk-in closet that could be sacrificed to make way for the elevator shaft, if eventually needed. The spaces in the basement and in the attic are open, so I don't expect a problem. It is sited so it can fit between two structural bents of the frame, requiring minimal framing alterations.

I have only very rough verbal quotes of $20-30K for the equipment and rough-ins, since I have no immediate plans for the project. Finishes would be extra.

I don't plan to do this ahead of time as maybe it won't be needed, but it seemed important to think about it ahead of time.

HTH

L.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2012 at 1:34PM
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jgopp

Great, thanks for the help so far. L: that quote seems considerably lower than I was expecting. Hopefully I'll be pleasantly surprised with the quoting, but who knows.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2012 at 3:31PM
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marcolo

Have you looked into pneumatic elevators??

    Bookmark   May 16, 2012 at 12:54PM
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jgopp

marcolo: I tried your link but it is giving me a 404. I'll google it though. Thanks.

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 6:15PM
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marcolo

It's Dayton Elevator.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2012 at 1:28AM
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jgopp

marcolo, thanks! That is a great option actually, I think it might be cheaper and actually much easier mechanically speaking. Plus it's kind of futuristic cool!

    Bookmark   May 31, 2012 at 11:34PM
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brickeyee

"futuristic cool"

The blood at the bleeding edge of technology is green.

It is the color of money.

    Bookmark   June 1, 2012 at 8:27AM
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