What do you call this wood work?

katie8422March 14, 2011

I think I asked a couple years ago, but didn't find an answer. I need more of these corner pieces, and I have no idea how to find them. I have spent hours scouring the internet with no luck. What words would you use to search for them?

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/mnk-3Hlc5hp47v-XB6lUGg?feat=directlink

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karinl

I think you'd just call them corner blocks, although that design may have a special name. The thread I've linked below happened to segue into corner blocks, and there is a link in the thread to a blog about getting replica ones made (though different from yours).

Yours might not be that complicated to make if someone did four at once (full circle) and then cut it into quarters. You could talk to a local millwork shop.

KarinL

Here is a link that might be useful: thread addressing corner blocks

    Bookmark   March 14, 2011 at 1:14PM
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sombreuil_mongrel

I don't know what they called them; I have seen them in some period houseplan books. The best way to describe them may be "quarter circle bullseye corner blocks". Whenever you try to source them out, a picture is worth a thousand words.
Casey

    Bookmark   March 14, 2011 at 7:54PM
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young-gardener

Katie- I have no advice but wanted to chime in to tell you that I think your server is just lovely!

    Bookmark   March 14, 2011 at 8:58PM
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Carol_from_ny

I don't know what you'd call them either but I would get a good pic of them and carry it with me to a few salvage shops. Somebody might know what they are called or where they can be purchased.

    Bookmark   March 15, 2011 at 2:57PM
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mkroopy

I'd call those some funkalicious corner blocks...wow I love those!

I highly doubt you'll find anything close to that online. When I was restoring my first Victorian farmhouse I searched and searched everywhere online for an exact match, and I never remember seeing anything like those...I would have remembered that.

You will probably have to pay a woodworker to cut a set of dies to match that pattern....that's what I did. Cost a couple hundred bucks, if I recall...not too bad, but then I had dozens of cracked corner blocks so I think I ordered like 50 when I ordered them. If this is the only cabinet molding you have like this, then that's a pricey way to go of course....

    Bookmark   March 15, 2011 at 4:13PM
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katie8422

Thanks young gardener!

And thanks everyone else for the info. I emailed a few millwork places around here and I'm waiting for responses.

Mkroopy, I only need 4 corner pieces so I'm hoping it's a reasonable price. Thanks for the $ figure!

    Bookmark   March 15, 2011 at 6:05PM
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concretenprimroses

soo pretty. They may have been made on the spot as the house was being built.
Kathy

    Bookmark   March 15, 2011 at 6:16PM
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brickeyee

They are usually made by gluing four square blacks together, turning the face on a lath, then separating the blocks (using hide glue and paper in the joint helps).

By gluing the blacks together then separating them kerf loss form cutting is eliminated.

No special cutter is needed, just the ability to duplicate the molding pattern on the lath.

A rotary cutter that large in diameter would be a nightmare (like normal bullseye blocks are made) to drive safely.

The large diameter also produces cutting speed problems (velocity of the cutting edge relative to the wood) between the outside and inside of the cutter.

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 11:33AM
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katie8422

Got my first response:

"Unfortunately there would be a custom knife charge. Looking at the profile I would estimate the knife charge to be $180.00. As for the set up and run charge it would be $75.00 for a total of $255.00. That price would not be different for 4 pieces or 20 pieces."

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 5:23PM
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sombreuil_mongrel

As Brick points out, these _must_ be turned on a lathe with a faceplate turning capability. I can't see this being done satisfactorily with a shaper or a rosette cutter, unless the rosette cutter is mounted into the dead end of a lathe and introduced into the spinning work piece.
I am less concerned with kerf loss than you are, Brick; Or for that matter the original millwork guy that made them in 1884.
Casey

    Bookmark   March 16, 2011 at 6:33PM
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kframe19

I believe at one time there were special mandrels or frames into which the pieces could be clamped to run on the lathe.

That way the glue could be done away with, greatly increasing production.

    Bookmark   March 20, 2011 at 1:37PM
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slateberry51

It looks like the knife would also be able to be used to create the profile for straight runs of molding in your house. Taking this into consideration, that might make the setup fee worthwhile. Most places will keep the knife indefinitely, so you'd be able to get more work milled in the future.

    Bookmark   March 20, 2011 at 2:19PM
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brickeyee

I actually have a square frame that fits on my larger wood lath for holding small pieces like corner blocks so that four can be shaped at a time.

I use it about as often as my ellipse turning adapter (not much).
The ellipse turning adapter is a noisy thing that can only be run at low RPM or it vibrates everything so much you cannot even use the thing.

It is not 'fun' turning since it is scraping and the gran keeps changing direction.

For a 'one off' job glue the blocks together with paper in the joint and then separate carefully.

    Bookmark   March 20, 2011 at 2:49PM
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fuzzywuzzer

Whatever they are, they are definitely Art Deco!
FW

    Bookmark   March 20, 2011 at 7:54PM
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la_koala

They are usually made by gluing four square blacks together, turning the face on a lath, then separating the blocks (using hide glue and paper in the joint helps).

Wow, brickeyee, that's a brilliant description! That never would have occurred to me, and it makes so much sense to get those corner blocks.

katie8422, the charge for making the knife seems the right order of magnitude to me. A few years ago, we had a custom knife made for the original pattern in our door casing (we were converting a window into a door and wanted the casing to match the rest of the doors in the room). I think we paid $175 to have the knife made at that time. As we intend to have more of the casing made when we re-do one of the other rooms, we felt it was a good investment.

HTH,
Lee

    Bookmark   March 20, 2011 at 9:18PM
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kframe19

I've cut a couple of planer knives over the years to recreate molding that was no longer available.

It was a pain, especially when I ruined the first one and had to start over.

    Bookmark   March 24, 2011 at 3:12PM
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katie8422

I don't think I want to pay that much for 4 pieces. This is the closest match I've found. Will it look odd if one room has these?

Here is a link that might be useful: quarter turn rosettes

    Bookmark   March 30, 2011 at 6:19PM
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columbusguy1

katie, if the cost of knife blades is too high--consider making a mold of the ones you have, and making new ones from composition or resin. They can be stained if you are going to do natural woodwork, or painted. Getting them to match real wood would be harder, but far cheaper.

    Bookmark   March 30, 2011 at 6:49PM
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katie8422

Who would I contact about making a mold? Only 1 or 2 millwork places even bothered to respond to me.

    Bookmark   March 31, 2011 at 6:48PM
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karinl

For a last-ditch effort to get them made out of wood affordably, try a local craftsman/artisan woodworker or woodturner maybe; the kind of person you'd find at a craft fair.

For molds, it wouldn't be a woodworking outfit but... I'm trying to think what kind of person. You know, that might be a pretty simply DIY job. There are likely instructions on the internet or books available.

The ones you've found for sale are not bad, if you're looking for something that would be somewhat consistent with others in the same room. But I don't see that you need to be consistent really - if it were me I'd take it as license to use something completely different, whatever you like. The molding is the same as is used with any corner block, bull's eye or what have you.

KarinL

    Bookmark   March 31, 2011 at 10:48PM
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palimpsest

Contact the person in this link. He may be able to help you.

He has hundreds of profiles knives and might have something close.

Could these be made as complete circles and cut into quarters?

Here is a link that might be useful: BH Davis

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 3:01PM
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columbusguy1

A mold you can do yourself--there are kits which use latex rubber I think. It looked pretty simple when I saw it done on a restoration show.
The link below has instructions, and is cheesy, but I got lots of internet hits when I put 'latex mold making' in the search box.

Here is a link that might be useful: Latex Mold video

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 9:56PM
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