Homemade and handy

JoeJOctober 3, 2004

These are a few tools that I have made or modified over the years. Perhaps these will give some of the newer folks some ideas and help.


These trammels are made from common hardware store items. and are good for any radius that you can find the 3/8" tube.


Working on sq. tube? that radius corner is a pain to hold a combination sq. on...no more.


1/2 clamps come in real handy for a lot of things. 1 small tack is all you need to hold them on.


Wedges, 7's and dogs, they can and will move mountains. Not sure of the name for the long nuts, but used mainly for hanging pipe. They are great for pulling, pushing or just holding parts. Here again, a small tack is all that's needed.

JoeJ

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JoeJ

I forgot the link, in case someone wants to put together a set of the trammels.

Here you go, have fun...

JoeJ

Here is a link that might be useful: Trammel Drawing

    Bookmark   October 3, 2004 at 9:09AM
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gonefishin

Thanks JoeJ, I think that I could use some of those half clamps, may try to make some, magnetic welders blocks come in handy at times too.
When you say a light tack, are you talking about just holding something long enough to tack it lightly, or are you talking about lightly tacking the clamp onto something ? Probably sounds like dumb question to you, since you already know what you mean, but it is not clear to me. Do you have a couple of pictures to demonstrate what you are talking about?
Something that I observed at a welding shop, where they are pretty danged good, while waiting to talk to one of the owners was:
One man had a triangle piece of about quarter inch plate or thicker, about two and a half feet long on the base side, that he was going to weld onto a retangular piece laying flat on the workbench. He sat it in place on the flat piece standing up at a right angle, lined it up where he wanted it, grabbed a mig welder and tacked it on each end just enough to hold it upright, got a square, and bent it over a little to a correct right angle then finished his weld with an arc welder. I was impressed, thought that it beat the heck out of the way I would have tried to do it by aligning to 90* and blocking and proping etc.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   October 3, 2004 at 9:38PM
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gooseberry_guy

JoeJ:

Rod couplings are what you are thinking of. The way you show them with a bolt in one end, makes for a good setter for Hilti stud anchors in Unistrut or other recessed channels and such. I usually lock the bolt in place with a nut before I use them for this purpose. They work real well for the 1/4 inch anchors especially, since it reduces the chance of hitting the anchor with a glancing blow and bending it over before you get it driven down to depth.

GG

    Bookmark   October 4, 2004 at 12:10AM
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JoeJ

Thanks GG,
Never used them for that. But I sure like the Hilti studs!!

GoneFishing,
A tack in the middle of the plate on the bottom of the clamp. If a good tack, you won't break it off with the vise grip clamps.

And don't ruin good clamps to make them!!! hehehehe, in time you will ruin a few anyway.

I used to tack 4 sides of stainless tanks together before squaring it up. As long as the pieces were sheared right it never was a problem.

Joe

    Bookmark   October 4, 2004 at 6:49PM
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