induction-ready pressure canner?

jadeiteAugust 6, 2012

Is an induction-ready pressure canner available in the US? I've checked this forum and online and haven't found anything that sounds workable. There's a Fagor pressure canning kit, but I have a Fagor pressure cooker and this sounds exactly like my cooker, i.e. no way to know what the pressure is. I don't think this would safely can low-acid foods.

Thanks,

Cheryl

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wizardnm

Cheryl, over a year ago I redid my kitchen and went to induction. I got a new WB canner that works fine but could not come up with a pressure canner either. So what I have used is the single element unit that I bought for my temporary kitchen to cook on. I kept it and it has worked well for using with my pressure canner. Just be sure to get a good one if you decide to go with one. Mine is like the one linked below.

Nancy

Here is a link that might be useful: Cadco Hot Plate

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 2:44PM
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dcarch7

Try Fagor Duo Stainless Steel 10 q. Pressure Cooker/canner. I think this one works on induction.

Otherwise get one of those heat transfer plates, which will allow you to use an alum. canner on an induction cook top.

dcarch

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 2:51PM
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jadeite

Nancy,

Thank you for the link and response. What size canner will fit on this hot plate? I have an electric hot plate I got when our previous kitchen was being remodelled, but it was pitifully underpowered. It took forever to heat water for pasta. Does your hot plate do a good job of heating a big canners without a long, long wait?

Cheryl

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 2:52PM
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jadeite

dcarch - the Fagor cooker/canner is what I already have. It has no pressure dial, so you can't tell what the pressure is. I don't think I would be comfortable not know if it was safe or not. Botulism is pretty serious.

The induction plates are very inefficient. I've tried it with my aluminium stockpot and it takes way too long to heat a big quantity of liquid. It's much slower than gas or direct induction.

Cheryl

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 2:55PM
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dcarch7

It is not the pressure that is important for canning, it is the temperature achievable at that pressure for canning safety. I am not sure.

You can get an inexpensive IR thermometer to measure the temperature of the vessel and see if yours can do the job.

I am at work now, I can't check the temperature for you.

dcarch

Here is a link that might be useful: IR termometer

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 3:06PM
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wizardnm

Cheryl, I just have a 12qt canner, the old basic Mirro kind. If you have a larger canner, you might want to check out the Cadco website.

Nancy

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 3:21PM
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jadeite

Nancy - thanks again. I don't have a pressure canner, but was thinking of getting one. Until I realized that there are none which work well with induction.

dcarch - you're right that I could use a thermometer to keep a check on the temperature, but there are two problems. One is that the temperature of the pot is not the same as the temperature of the contents. There is generally heat loss because conduction isn't very efficient. The other problem is that all canning recipes are given in terms of the pressure required, not temperature. Yes, I could do the conversion, but this adds to the number of steps I have to take, not to mention having to check the temperature regularly. A pressure canner with gauge or weights is a simple solution, as long as I find a way to heat it.

Cheryl

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 3:53PM
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TobyT

We have a propane ring that we use for pressure canning of fish when we are out in the boondocks. Works great and is also good for a corn or seafood boil for a crowd. Not expensive at all.
Jane

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 7:06PM
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dcarch7

Cheryl, given a reasonable amount of time, the contain should be the same temperature as the PC or higher.

The Fagor PC I named above says it is safe for canning low acid food.

DC

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 10:19PM
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annie1992

I've also used the burner of a turkey fryer that I got at a yard sale to can outside when it's hot. I just did 6 pints of corn. You do have to keep it out of the breeze, though, if there is any.

My old boss got an induction stove top and swore that her pressure canner worked on it, but I don't know how.

Annie

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 10:25PM
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jadeite

Thanks to all the replies. DH says we could put something on the gas grill which could be turned into a gas burner. I've never tried this, but it seems worth a shot. Alternatively I might look into a burner which could be plugged in as Nancy suggests.

dcarch - I know Fagor claims it is safe. I don't know what this is based on. I have a Fagor pressure cooker and wouldn't use it for low acid foods, but perhaps I'm just a coward. Thanks for your suggestions but I don't know how to test the results for safety, and I'm not willing to eat something that could make me very sick.

Cheryl

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 11:00PM
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dcarch7

I seem to remember 250F is safe. It has been a while since I canned. It would be easy to find out.

If you meassure the PC and it gets to 250F with the pressure valve on, it will always be 250F inside, makes no difference how much stuff is inside the PC.

dcarch

    Bookmark   August 6, 2012 at 11:37PM
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dcarch7

I should say that it will always be 250F inside regardless of how much stuff is inside the PC, and the same next time and the next time you can. The only it will be different is when the atmospheric pressure chages.

It also doesn't matter how high you set the fire.

Always 250F

dcarch

    Bookmark   August 7, 2012 at 12:10AM
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jadeite

OK, I did more homework and have found out that most modern pressure cookers work at 15 psi, or 250F as dcarch said. So my Fagor should reach a safe temperature. If I'm conservative about the times, I should be OK.

The outdoor options would work on aluminium pressure canners, so our grill should do the job. Or a camping stove or turkey fryer as Jane and Annie use. So I have several options to try out.

Thank you all very much,
Cheryl

    Bookmark   August 7, 2012 at 10:03AM
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