Whirlpool WFW9050XW opinions?

andreww_2009November 3, 2010

This Whirlpool washer WFW9050XW (and the matching dryer YWED9050XW) look like they might just fit stacked in our space, with a side venting and rectangular duct on the dryer. Or it just won't fit, it's that close.

The only way to be positive of the fit is to buy and install it (Future Shop will let us return if it doesn't fit, but we're pretty sure it will).

Haven't found any reviews beyond what's on the FS site. Does anyone have an opinion?

We're also thinking of keeping our Inglis TL where it is and putting a 24" Samsung dryer (DV665) in a clothes closet that backs onto the space. We had earlier rejected doing this with a 27" dryer (because it wouldn't fit) but a 24" would just do it. Concerned about whether a 2000W dryer will work in a reasonable time and whether we'll end up doing one king sheet at a time.

Any thoughts on this dryer would also be appreciated.

Thanks!

=aw

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asolo

"The only way to be positive of the fit is to buy and install it"

Don't quite get this. Tape measure won't suffice?

Not sure, but don't believe this model has a built-in heater. Believe only ATC, which is a joke with these machines. I would not not have any of the HE machines without a heater. Without one, you'll never get a hot wash.

FWIW, I've had similar model Duet 9400 for more than five years giving excellent results and no problems.

    Bookmark   November 3, 2010 at 2:30PM
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andreww_2009

Thanks for the advice. The hot water from the tap is wicked hot (too hot to hold your hand in it), if I had control over the temperature I'd turn it down for safety but I don't. I'm hoping that will lead to hot enough water.

For size, it's within 1/2" on the depth. I calculate we have 30.5" for the closet door to close. We've analyzed exactly where the 240V plug will sit wrt to the stacked unit (since the plug is 1" deep), where the standpipe comes out of the wall (and how far), how much clearance the drain hose should need to turn, everything we can think of.

It looks like it will not fit with a 4" round duct stuck on the back, probably not quite fit with a rectangular duct stuck on the back, and just fit with a rectangular duct stuck on the side (by "fit" I mean it will push back far enough for the door to close).

Other machines have a depth of 30.5" (with side venting of the dryer) but we have things like the point where the washer lid is screwed to the back falling exactly where the 240V plug needs to go.

So I'm not willing to declare it a fit until I see it. FS will let us return it if it doesn't fit (or if we don't like it) even with them stacked (since FS sells the stacking kit) but the moment we side-vent it, it's non-returnable.

=aw

    Bookmark   November 3, 2010 at 5:03PM
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caryscott

I've had a DV665 for almost a year. Not a beloved machine but I haven't found it to be nearly as bad as the reviews I had read. I had an initial problem where it made an unusual noise when not using the programmed settings (it makes the noise on any setting that is determined by time rather than the sensor). They replaced the board and then the whole dryer and the second one makes the same noise on the same settings as the first. I tend to use the "very dry" setting rather timed settings anyway. I have straight 15' run for the vent. I have the matching washer and which has a good 1200rpm spin cycle but I find the dryer rarely runs longer than an hour. On those occasions when loads are mixed I usually pull out what is dry and do another 15-25 minutes and every thing is dry. I have the matching front load washer which has 1200 rpm spin cycle. I'm not one to overload the washer or the dryer (I suspect the real issue for many pf those who have had problems with the dryer). DV665 has performed well in my experience.

    Bookmark   November 3, 2010 at 5:57PM
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asolo

Be advised that your hot water supply, whether "wicked hot" or not, won't help you much. The mass of the metal in the inner and outer drums plus the clothes at room temperature will bleed so much heat out of it you'll hardly believe it.

For example my Duet receiving only-hot water supply at 130F from the first drop entering the machine provides a "hot" wash of about 105F when set on "hot" but with no boost from the on-board heater. If I want to wash anything at any time hotter than that, I have to select a cycle that uses the on-board heater to boost the temperature in the machine.

These low-fill-volume machines are all like this. Also the more-or-less worthless ATC controls in these low-fill-volume machines often mix cold/hot even when set on "hot" cycles. Mfgrs' idea of "hot" these days is anything over about 90F....except they won't tell you that unless you call them and are able to talk with someone who even knows what their settings are. It's the entire industry's dirty little secret these days. Consumer's lifelong ideas of "cold", "warm", and "hot" have no relationship to what these modern machines actually deliver.

If you're only "hoping" it will be otherwise, I encourage you to re-think the matter. If you know today that you'll never need an actually-hot wash at any time as long as you own the machine, OK. Otherwise, please consider a model with a built-in heater.

    Bookmark   November 3, 2010 at 6:07PM
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andreww_2009

Thanks for the data points. How do you measure the water temperature inside the machine, just wait til it loads then stick a thermometer in it? What kind of thermometer?

=aw

    Bookmark   November 4, 2010 at 2:50PM
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asolo

Measured after machine completely filled, well into its wash-cycle, and stabilized.

Used instant-read thermometer available almost everywhere, certainly at any hardware store.

    Bookmark   November 4, 2010 at 4:01PM
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laundryman

Contrary to what asolo just said, I decided to run my own experiment. I have a Kenmore HE3, it's 7 yrs old. It does have ATC. I have my hot water heater set at 125 degrees. My washer is approximately 20 feet from the hot water heater. Here is a laundry sink half way between the water and the washer. I Just put a load of whites in the washer. Before running the machine I opened the hot water faucet at the laundry sink until it ran hot. I started the washer. Once the washer was finished filling, I took and instant read thermometer and placed it in the washer--the reading--114 degrees. Five minutes into the washer 105 degrees. Washers with ATC control will not allow water over 120 degrees to enter the tub. If It is over 120 the ATC will kick in and start mixing it with cold water. My whole point to this is, even in a traditional top load washer, feed with 140 degree water and no ATC you will still not have 140 degree water once it's done filling and with just moments of the agiation beginning the temp inside a top loader will drop dramatically. What truely needs to be considered here is, if your washer is not near the hot water heater, then yes, a heater would be beneficial. If your washer is near the hot water heater then you can very easly get by without one. Todays fabrics are made to me washed at lower temps and release soils easier then even 10 yrs ago.

    Bookmark   November 8, 2010 at 4:34PM
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asolo

I wouldn't say "contrary". It seems to me we're on the same page.

On other threads I've read about ATC-controlled machines delivering a range of unexpected temperatures. Do not know method of posters' measurements. Do not know if there are industry standards for ATC or if each manufacturer programs them the way they want to. The reported variations have been surprising and annoying. User's having to learn "new" definitions of cold/warm/hot.

For myself, I do not regard the 105F wash I get when I select "hot" on the machine as "hot". That's my idea of warm. Nor do I regard 90-95 as "warm"...which is what I get when I set "warm" on the machine. But.....I've told my tale. As long as I know how to get what I want out of my machine, I'm happy. Do resent having to pay this much attention, though.

    Bookmark   November 8, 2010 at 5:13PM
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suburbanmd

Laundryman, when you say "today's fabrics", do you mean just the new synthetics, or cottons also?

    Bookmark   November 8, 2010 at 5:56PM
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laundryman

I am referring to ALL fabrics. When you go to the store and feel ANY fabric, have you noticed how soft it feels???--that's because ALL fabrics have been treated in some fashion.

Asolo. Pay attention to what??? what is soooooooooo diffrent in doing laundry. Yes, maybe the method has changed, but the principles remain the same.

    Bookmark   November 8, 2010 at 9:40PM
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suburbanmd

Yeah, new clothes are treated so they feel very soft. But I find that the treatment usually washes out.

    Bookmark   November 8, 2010 at 10:09PM
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gates1

My he3t will allow hot water through the ATC over 120, I know this cause I did an experiement. I cranked my heater up to 145-150 and set the washer on a hot wash. No cold water entered my machine. I had my hand on the cold water hose and it never came on during the fill. Now when I wash in warm, then yes it does add cold water. My temp setting are this. Sanitary, 153 (heater Boosted) 130-140, depends on either heavy duty or whitest whites. Warm 105 cold is 70

    Bookmark   November 9, 2010 at 9:02AM
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asolo

Laundryman....pay attention to what? Pay attention to difference between what the mfg means by their labels and descriptions of "warm" and "hot" as opposed to what I think is "warm" and "hot".....so I can actually obtain the wash temperatures I want in the machine. Thought I was clear about that.

If I didn't "pay attention" I'd still be getting 105F washes when I wanted a "hot" wash. The setting says "hot" but the cycle doesn't deliver actual "hot". If I didn't "pay attention" I wouldn't know that. I wouldn't know to choose a different cycle using the heater when I wan't actual "hot" wash -- or how hot that would be -- because the manual doesn't tell you. You have to call the mfg and "pay attention" to what they disclose to you or you won't be able to know.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2010 at 9:15AM
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dadoes

Washers with ATC control will not allow water over 120 degrees to enter the tub. If It is over 120 the ATC will kick in and start mixing it with cold water.That's an incorrect blanket statement, it depends on the characteristics of the individual machine. I have three washers with ATC (two are HE toploaders, one is a "semi-"HE toploader) and all of them provide full tap-hot incoming water flow on the hot temperature setting. In fact, one of the machine's ATC function modulates the warm incoming flow to 115ðF / 46ðC -- confirmed checking it by thermometer. I find there's an initial drop of 10ðF to 12ðF on the resultant temp in the tub. Of course, the temp will continue to drop throughout the wash period if there's no onboard water heater.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2010 at 2:25PM
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laundryman

It is a Correct Blanket statement to make dadoes, just because one machine my differ slightly at the temp when the ATC kicks in does not make it invalid. IN GENERAL, that is how ATC works GEEZ. Guess i'm not OCD enough to hang out here, i'm outta here for good.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2010 at 3:11PM
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asolo

laundryman....

With respect, you didn't say "in general", did you? You said "washers with ATC..." didn't you? Sounds "blanket" to me.

Own your stuff, man. It's OK. I learn new things every day. Often from other people. Often at the expense of what I thought was correct earlier but learned it wasn't. Don't you?

If you want to go, go. But I don't think your snit adds much to the discussion.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2010 at 3:24PM
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dadoes

LaundryMan, my intention was not to upset you, but simply to point out that the statement is not correct. You said that washers with ATC "will not allow water over 120 degrees to enter the tub. If It is over 120 the ATC will kick in and start mixing it with cold water."

Of course, ATC works by mixing cold water and hot. Some ATC machines do restrict the hot temp, but not all of them.

I have three machines with ATC in my house at this moment and get full 140ðF incoming hot water (the maximum my water heater can produce) on all of them on the hot setting, they do not mix-in cold water on the Hot temp setting, at least not on an incoming temp of 140ðF. I don't have a way to test what might happen with a hotter incoming flow, 160ðF for example.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2010 at 4:47PM
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thecotos_verizon_net

How has the machine functioned overall? I am considering it.
Thanks

    Bookmark   April 14, 2011 at 12:30PM
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