Pickled radish?

carmen_grower_2007May 11, 2010

Has anyone heard of this? How can I make it and can it?

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jimster

What type of pickled radish do you have in mind? One type is Takuan, which is often used as a sushi ingredient.

Jim

Here is a link that might be useful: Takuan

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 4:29PM
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marys1000

Sorry I'm not much help. You might look at other pickling recipes that don't have dill etc. like watermelon rind pickles.

My mother used to serve radishes in a plain oil and vinegar with salt like a salad.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 6:09PM
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kayskats

you might google daikon ... which is a type of radish ...
I didn't see any suitable for canning, but then I didn't look too hard ... a number paired daikon radish with carrots....

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 8:03PM
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rachelellen

Many cultures pickle a variety of radish types. I'd have to know what type of pickle you are looking for...was it something you ate somewhere or read of?

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 8:26PM
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readinglady

I see you cross-posted at Harvest and I wasn't sure which forum you check more frequently or if there's a difference.

If you do a search under Daikon on the Harvest forum, you'll see some threads for Asian-style kimchee and pickles.

I've seen fermented radish pickles (mainly Asian - Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Thai) and refrigerated pickles. There is a bread-and-butter radish pickle that's been posted on Chow with some comments.

Fermented or salted pickles can be refrigerated or kept at cool room temperatures; others need refrigeration exclusively.

I don't know of any canned radish pickle recipe. If you are serious I could do some searching in my sources or you could always take a 100% vinegar brine and try a test-jar. But radishes are quite pungent and I'm not sure the results would be appealing in texture, smell or flavor. In fact, Beverly Alfeld in Pickles to Relish did a canned pickle relish but neither she nor her testers were impressed. Canned the radishes lost their color and flavor and the result wasn't a winner.

Another option for an excess of radishes is to pickle the pods. That's a recipe for an old 19th century pickle called, I think, rat-tail pickles. I do have a modernized version of that recipe that might be fun to try, but again it's refrigerated, not canned.
Carol

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 11:15PM
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dgkritch

I have these 2 recipes but havenÂt tried them.
Let us know if you do and what you think!

Deanna

Radish Salsa
1 T extra virgin olive oil
1 T red wine vinegar
1/8 tsp sugar
1/8 tsp dry mustard
dash of salt and fresh ground pepper
1/4 c red radish matchsticks
1/4 c seeded cucumber matchsticks
Whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, sugar, mustard salt and pepper in a small bowl. Stir in the radish and cucumber, cover and refrigerate.

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Radish Relish

3 cups stemmed radishes
2 large ribs celery
1 large red onion
2 tsp salt
1 cup sugar
1 tbls mustard seed
2 tsp dill seed
1/2 tsp celery seed
1 cup vinegar
2 tbls prepared horseradish

Put the radishes, celery and onion through the coarse blade of a grinder, or chop them fiely. Mix with remaining ingredients and allow to stand three hours. Bring to a boil in a large pan and cook ten minutes. Pour into hot jars, leaving half-inch head space. Adjust lids and process 1/2 pints and pints in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes.

 Posted by gardenlad 6b KY (My Page) on
Mon, Oct 9, 06 at 11:44
Here you go, guys.
The recipe was originally called Rosy Radish Relish. And when made with regular radishes it does have a rosy hue. But I make it with all sorts of radishes, including white daikon, colored Asians, and other winter radishes.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2010 at 6:20PM
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laceyvail

I can't remember where I got this recipe, and I haven't tried it yet, but it looks good for a radish lover,.

Daikon Relish

2 Daikon, about 1 1/2 lbs
2 medium carrots
Cut radish and carrots crosswise to fit pint jars. quarter each lenthwise, then slice lengthwise into thin slivers. Pack into jars.

Combine 2 3/4 c. rice vinegar
1 c. water
2 Tbl. honey
2 tsp chopped ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 small hot peppers
2 Tbl soy sauce

Bring liquid to a boil and pour over radish and carrots leaving 1/4" headspace. Process 10 minutes in water bath.

I would think any radish could be used. This is the only pickled radish recipe I have seen that calls for canning. Even in The Joy of Pickling, all the radish recipes are for eating within a week.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 7:28AM
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donna_loomis

I don't have a recipe, but I wish I did. More than a dozen years ago, one of my Filipino friends gave me a jar of picked radishes (don't know if they were canned or not), which I kept in the refrigerator. When I opened the jar at the dinner table, everyone visibly pulled away from the table (except me - I thought the smell was wonderful). I ate nearly half the contents in that quart jar during the meal. I was instructed never to open that jar in the house again, LOL. I would have to eat them outside. These were sliced, I believe it was daikon. I would love to be able to make these myself, but my friend is no longer in this country to give me the recipe.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 1:13PM
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annie1992

the other thing about radishes, when they are cooked they lose the "hot" and become more reminiscent of a turnip, at least in my opinion.

So, canning in a boiling water bath very well may cook them to the point where they lose the hot "bite", although I've never canned them, so I don't really know.

Annie

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 1:16PM
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readinglady

That Daikon Relish sounds intriguing but without knowing the source, I'm not sure it meets current canning standards.

That's a lot of low-acid product and rice wine vinegar tends to be less than 5% acidity.

I'm with Annie. I have a gut feeling that generally pickled or fermented radishes retain their character best if they're not canned.

(Though I know people who love them sliced in stir-fry.)

Carol

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 2:59PM
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