Can I use 'kitchen cotton' yarn for socks?

bayareafrancyFebruary 11, 2009

Has anyone ever tried using the inexpensive and colorful kitchen "dishcloth" yarn (like Sugar'n Cream, Peaches'n Cream, etcl) for socks?

Although it might not make the softest socks, I'm wondering how it would work for a basic, thickish, ragg style sock. It is so cheap and readily available. I wonder if it would hold its shape well. And be long lasting?

I can't find any info online (no patterns, or blog photos of anyone who has done this).

Thoughts?

:-)

Francy

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
donna_loomis

I don't know of anyone who has tried using kitchen cotton for socks. But I am pretty sure I would not want to wear socks made of this yarn. It really has no give or stretch and would surely be uncomfortable to wear, even as house socks. Just my opinion.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2009 at 2:52PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tami_ohio

There is no reason you couldn't try it. I'm not sure I would want a pair made from it, but you only lose the time spent making them if you don't like them. You can always rip them out and make dish cloths from it. Use a pattern that calls for worsted weight yarn. I don't think they would hold their shape very well, and would certainly stretch out of shape.

Tami

    Bookmark   February 11, 2009 at 6:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sandra_ferguson

Ditto what the others said....to my mind it would make a thick sock with absolutely no give, which I think socks must have...If you decide to try it, at least do the whole sock in some sort of ribbing (not the bottom of the foot, of course, or the heel flap, but the rest of it...at least this would lend a bit of elasticity that will be totally missing if you don't knit it in somehow.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2009 at 7:17PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
socks

I don't think cotton is the best yarn for socks. I don't think it would stretch well or keep your feet very warm.

    Bookmark   February 11, 2009 at 9:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bayareafrancy

Thank you for the input. It all makes sense! Rats--that yarn is so colorful and cheap! I love making dishcloths with it.

My picky husband wants cotton--pure cotton--socks. For less than a zillion bucks a pair. I cannot find 100% cotton socks anywhere--in part for the reasons given above. But he seems to think they exist. Husbands!

:-)

Francy

    Bookmark   February 11, 2009 at 10:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
profsusan

I would also agree about the kitchen cotton. However, my dad is diabetic so we always need to find different types of socks - non-binding, 100% cotton, made in USA, etc. Here's a link to a place we order from online that has been good - some of the socks are only 99% cotton but may satisfy hubby

Here is a link that might be useful: DrLeonards.com

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 8:57AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sandra_ferguson

Profsusan...you might want to do a bit of online reading on diabetes and the use of cotton socks....I believe the thinking on all cotton socks is changing, and here's something I found that does make sense;
Socks Tested for Producing Blisters
A team of University of Missouri-Columbia biological engineering students tested 10 popular brands of athletic socks. The testing device held the sock against a form at a set pressure and calculates when it begins to slip - just as socks rub against your skin. The test was done in a humidity chamber to simulate sweating. This revealed the coefficient of friction (COF) for each sock - a higher COF means a blister is more likely to develop.
Synthetic Socks Mean Less Blister-Causing Friction
All-cotton socks performed poorly while nylon socks did much better. The higher priced socks did not test any better than the inexpensive brands. The test also showed where on the sock synthetic fabric is needed to produce less friction. "I would look for a pair that had different compositions of materials in different parts of the sock," s. "I would not want a sock that was overall cotton. I might look for a sock that had some of those synthetic materials that were proven to be better."
What's Wrong With Cotton Socks?
Cotton does not wick moisture away from the skin, but holds it next to the skin. Synthetic fabrics such as nylon and polyester draw the moisture away from the skin so it can be evaporated in the shoe. Wool socks also have moisture-management properties.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 9:20AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bayareafrancy

Thank you for the link!

TheHusband doesn't want any "plastic" (as he calls it) touching his feet. Wool, of course, would be fine, but soft (non itchy) wool would make for pricey socks (and he wants them cheap).

On a different note:

What else can I use this yarn for? Maybe I should post a new thread.... someone mentioned she did a sweater. Maybe I could try that.

:-)

francy

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 11:18AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tami_ohio

Francy, you can get cotton blend sock yarn. Yes, most sock yarn is pricey, but you can find some that isn't quite so bad. Ask him what he thinks your time is worth. I find that a simple pair of socks with only about 2" of ribbing, the rest in stockinette stitch, takes me 20 to 25 hours per pair! Even sock yarn that is, say, $3.50 a skein, isn't "cheap" when you figure in the time it takes to make them!!!!!! I know a young lady that saw me knitting socks while I was out. She kept asking me when I was going to knit her a pair. I finally told her when she could afford to pay me $150 per pair! She about passed out choking! I told her the yarn she saw me using was $17/100g skeing (maiking one pair) and 20 hours to knit. She quit asking! But for Christmas (I see her at least once a week) I knitted her a pair of sock Christmas ornaments. She was tickled to death with them!

Tami

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 11:31AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bayareafrancy

What a relief to know that it takes someone else 25 hours/pair! Actually, I haven't timed myself too much yet (I'm on my first ever sock), but last night it took about an hour to do an inch and a quarter of ribbing.

While searching the net I found a blog where a lady did knit socks with "kitchen cotton." I emailed her to find out the result.

I think TheHubby can just buy his own darn socks, and I'll work on making them for myself and my sons!

:-)

francy

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 2:27PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
profsusan

Sandra, Thanks for the info and as much we try to change Dad's mind, he still wants cotton (and made in the USA)! I have been buying running socks for my daughter and daughter-in-law for years as stocking stuffers since although they like them, don't want to spend the money for the ones that wick away the moisture. Bought them for Dad also but he doesn't like them. Another grumpy old man :-)

    Bookmark   February 12, 2009 at 4:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
qiviut

If you want cheap 100% wool for his sock try Knitpicks
That 100gm hank is enough yardage for a pair of women's socks.

Or keep an eye out for close outs at
Webs http://www.yarn.com/index.cfm
and
Elann http://elann.com/products.asp

Don't forget to knit at a tighter gauge than you would normally to give longer lasting wear

Here is a link that might be useful: Knitpicks

    Bookmark   February 13, 2009 at 1:57AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tami_ohio

And if you decide to knit his socks, put re-enforcing thread at the heel and toe. My DH has been forbidden to wear handmade socks to work! His work socks end up with holes in them. I told him I put too much work into them for him to wear them to work and ruin them!

Tami

    Bookmark   February 13, 2009 at 8:37AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rmlanza

Francy, I've been wanting to get some of the Cascade Fixation yarn to knit socks for my MIL. She is allergic to just about everything and this yarn is 99% cotton and 1% elastic. I saw a baby hat knit out of it at my LYS and it was really soft. Here's a link to the Cascade site. At my LYS this yarn is around $7 a ball I think.

Robin

Here is a link that might be useful: Cascade Fixation

    Bookmark   February 20, 2009 at 7:37AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bayareafrancy

Oooooh--thank you for that link! That looks just perfect! And less bulky than worsted weight, but not that fingering weight that drives me up the wall and down again. And lots of cute free patterns.

I found some cheap prices online too, but I have to investigate shipping charges.

Yahoo!

:-)

francy

    Bookmark   February 20, 2009 at 12:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rmlanza

Sure thing, let me know about the cheap prices you've found! I've been hoping they'd come out with more colors. I love the self striping yarns but I think all they have is solids and maybe a couple of varieagated.

Have fun!
Robin

    Bookmark   February 20, 2009 at 7:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tami_ohio

Francy & Robin, please make sure you either knit LOOSELY or maybe use bigger needles to knit with the Cascade Fixation yarn. If you knit tightly with it, the socks will be too tight to wear. Ask me how I know!!!!! Had I made the socks looser, I think I would have liked them, as I did wear them a couple of times. But they were almost too tight, so I quit wearing them as my feet swell. I, personally, don't care to work with that yarn again. It might not be so bad now, as I have learned to knit a bit looser that I did when I made that pair using the Cascade Fixation. You have to remember the elastic in the yarn won't stretch anymore than it already has if you knit tightly. If the yarn is relaxed in the stitches, then the elastic will still stretch. Am I making sense? It's 10:30pm and I'm tired!

Tami

    Bookmark   February 20, 2009 at 10:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rmlanza

Thanks for the tip Tami! I came across that problem with the Patons stretch yarn. And now I've got a pair on my needles with the Patons that I think I'm knitting TOO loosely, it's really really stretchy. So I guess it still takes some getting used to.

Looks like the Cascade Fixation does come in more colors than I thought. I may give it a try for some summer anklets for my DD.

Robin

    Bookmark   February 21, 2009 at 9:45AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bayareafrancy

Thank you Tami!

Right now, in my beginner sock stage, I find I am knitting quite tightly (in order to avoid ladders, and to keep the needles under control). So that is very good to know!

:-)

francy

    Bookmark   February 21, 2009 at 5:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tami_ohio

If you want natural fibers for socks, look into the bamboo, or the stuff made from crab shells. Your DH may not like them because I've mostly seen girly colors, but I love the way they feel! Soooo soft and comfortable! It is the sock weight fingering yarn, so if you are having trouble with that size yarn, you might want to slowly go thinner, maybe using sport weight next. I don't think acrylic socks are very comfortable to wear, but maybe practice knitting a tube that you can turn into cell phone covers, golf club covers, ect., just for practice working with the thinner yarns.

Tami

    Bookmark   February 21, 2009 at 9:09PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Have you done this?
I knitted a sweater. It was with a yarn that was the...
barb_roselover_in
Looking For Annie's bed doll crochet Collections
Hi I am interested in collecting Annie's bed doll crochet...
rj2ajs6
Crochet Owl Fingerless Gloves
If you have some left over yarn you can easily to make...
jane_green
Need Musical Notes/Instruments Afghan ideas...
I am thinking ahead to October. My daughter's boyfriend...
profsusan
looking for Annies Attic Dainty Dress Up Pattern
Does anyone out there have or know where I can get...
nursemom
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™