Quarter round

ionized_gwDecember 15, 2012

Is quarter round normally tapered at doorways or tapered? Thanks for reading.

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gregmills_gw

Do you a have a pic?

    Bookmark   December 16, 2012 at 1:06AM
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ionized_gw

Sorry, I meant tapered as in 45 degree or blunt cut. To me it looks funny at 90 degrees, but previously it was at 45 degrees and it looks awkward to me blunt.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2012 at 8:23PM
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brickeyee

You can cut it 45 degrees or do a return.
It is a whatever style you prefer.

Sometimes you can just but it up to thick door casing.

It depends on the door casing thickness at thee outer edge and the baseboard and quarter round thickness stack up.

This post was edited by brickeyee on Sun, Dec 16, 12 at 20:29

    Bookmark   December 16, 2012 at 8:27PM
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weedyacres

I cut mine at 22.5 degrees. They're painted.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2012 at 10:12PM
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ionized_gw

Forgive my igorance. What is a "return"?

    Bookmark   December 16, 2012 at 10:40PM
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ionized_gw

I see, apparently there is no convention with how the door casing and baseboard meet either. I'm not doing this, a flooring contractor is. The door casings are pretty much flush with the baseboards (not perfectly). They installed quarter-round cut blunt that ended right next to the outer edge of the door casings. It looked "unfinished" to me so I asked them to change it. They said that in 20 years of floor replacements they have never cut them at an angle. It seemed far-fetched to me. In the rooms that they are not working in the quarter rounds are cut at an angle.

Given that the baseboards and door casings are undercut to make room for another layer of flooring, what might look best is to continue on with the quarter round to the INNER edge of the door casing either cut straight or an angle. The trouble with that is that the door casings vary a little in shape and in how they mate with the baseboard even though they appear to be the same style. That means some time-consuming carving if we go that way.

Thanks for looking and for your comments.

    Bookmark   December 17, 2012 at 11:57AM
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brickeyee

A return is a miter in the trim that than buts to the surface.

They are usually 45 degrees miters so the trim 'dies' in the surface it is mounted on.

    Bookmark   December 17, 2012 at 4:20PM
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gregmills_gw

Everyone kind of has their "way" of installing quarter round. Some like to straight cut the ends others like to taper the ends and others like to put a return.

Is there a correct way? I dont think so. I would think if you have quarter round in a different part of the house it would make sense to mimic how that was done.

    Bookmark   December 17, 2012 at 6:02PM
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glennsfc

ionized said, "They said that in 20 years of floor replacements they have never cut them at an angle."

You've got to be kidding.

90 degree blunt cut molding looks unfinished, no matter how you look at it. Quarter round, or what we call shoe molding, stops where the baseboard joins the door casing, as in your pic. Extending it past the baseboard would be a visual insult.

    Bookmark   December 18, 2012 at 6:21PM
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ionized_gw

Yes, I doubt their veracity. I can see that it might be blunt-ended if it butted onto a door casing that was the same depth or deeper than the shoe molding.

    Bookmark   December 18, 2012 at 6:43PM
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homebound

For shoe molding I cut them at 22.5. A few times I nipped off half it at 22.5 (leaving 1/2 against the baseboard at 90). I picked that one up from other jobs and kind of liked it. Maybe that would be a good compromise for the ends of 1/4 round, too. You have to do a test piece and see what you think.

This post was edited by homebound on Tue, Dec 18, 12 at 18:53

    Bookmark   December 18, 2012 at 6:45PM
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ionized_gw

In the case of my walls, doors and floors, I am sure that there are 50 ways that are better than leaving it blunt like they did it the first time :-) It really looked moronic.

    Bookmark   December 18, 2012 at 6:57PM
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