fryer vs broiler vs roaster....

foodonastumpMarch 12, 2009

Is there any difference, aside from size?

I'm interested in trying the Roasted Sticky Chicken that Teresa posted in the linked thread, and as I often see elsewhere, it calls for a 3 pound chicken. Down in the thread someone asks if it should be a roaster or a fryer. What's the difference? And where are people finding these 3 pound chickens - I'm lucky if I can find a fryer under 5 pounds!

Here is a link that might be useful: Roasted Sticky Chicken

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annie1971

I think it's just the size/age of the bird. Most roasters are over 5 lbs, however I usually roast a fryer (they're smaller, usually with less fat). Don't know what a "broiler" is. I stew, fry, broil or roast both roasters and fryers.

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 2:42PM
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lindac

No difference but size....which of course depends on age. Broiler/fryer (used interchangeable) is a little, young chicken only about 10 weeks old and weiging about 3 pounds. A roaster is the big bird.
Linda C

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 2:47PM
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gbsim1

All I know is don't use a hen! One of my most memorable cooking fiascos was when I used a hen that I cut up to bake in an oven recipe. It was like trying to cut a car tire. This was 30 years ago when we were recently married but we still remember it and thank goodness we didn't have company over for dinner!

Grace

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 3:23PM
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Bumblebeez SC Zone 7

I did something similar 15 years ago, Grace. The car tire analogy is correct!

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 3:30PM
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lindac

It's called a "stewing hen" for good reason! Lots of flavor, little tenderness, but for when it's cooked long enough. Then it becomes edible...cook it a looooong time.
and remember, with a stewing hen, it's all about the broth.
Linda C

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 3:33PM
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kathleenca

I've always read that fryers (younger birds) should be under 4 lb. for tenderness. But I find it difficult to find packaged cut-up fryers that size; most are well over 4 lb. Maybe another example of the super-sizing that's all around us?

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 6:50PM
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jazmynsmom

Your question made me think of this video clip... pity I can't find the whole episode online...

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 7:47PM
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lindac

Just love her!!!!I miss Julia!!
I have a "source" ( chicken raising friend) who raises organic free range chickens.....and I have a 12 week old almost 6 pound chicken in my freezer.
It's not all about age, it's about breed of chicken.
This bird will have amazing flavor, be very very tender, have a moderate amount of fat and be all around amazing....AND very expensive! Her sister was very flavorful and tender....but was roasted about 6 hours after she was pecking bugs in the field
I pay about $1.80 or so for chicken in the store. Last week one store had a special of whole chickens for $.69 a pound.
the free range are about $4 a pound. Great for a special occasion, but too much for me for every day.
Linda C

    Bookmark   March 12, 2009 at 8:04PM
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