St. Patrick's Day Dinner

ann_tMarch 18, 2014

I've never really cared for boiled corned beef. So last year I tried a new method. Seasoned with lots of black pepper, wrapped in foil and slow roasted in a 250ðF for about six hours.

Did the same this year. Purchased a 2.3kilo corned brisket from a local butcher.

Ready for the oven.

Moist and tender.


Individual servings of colcannon topped with caramelized onions.

I have sourdough rye rising. And lots of leftover corned brisket. Bread should be ready late morning. Looking forward to a corned beef sandwich.

~Ann

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marilyn_c

That brisket looks delicious! I am going to try it! Thanks....and the colcannon topped with carmelized onions.....that too!

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 11:59AM
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angelaid

That looks awesome!

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 12:28PM
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ann_t

Marilyn, I got the idea for the Colcannon from Monique. She has the recipe on her blog. I adapted it just slightly. Left out the bacon and added caramelized onions.

Here is a link that might be useful: Monique's Colcannon.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 12:33PM
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trailrunnerbiker

Wow....that looks wonderful ! Please post your SD rye too. c

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 2:52PM
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ann_t

Trailrunner, here is the recipe.

Sourdough Rye Bread
Edited March 2014

Sourdough Biga

2 ounces of sourdough starter
1 cup white
1/2 cup rye flour
1 cup of water

1-1/2 cups rye flour
3 cups bread flour
1/2 cup whole wheat
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoons yeast (optional)
2 to 3 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon molasses
2 tablespoons melted butter
Approximately 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups water
Optional : add 1/4 cup of cocoa to darken the bread

Egg Wash

I use a Magic Mill to do my kneading.

Mix flour, biga (yeast if using) and water. Add the molasses
and melted butter. Mix just until everything is incorporated. Let rest for 20 minutes. Add salt, mix again and let rest another 20minutes. Knead for a few minutes. Place in a buttered or oiled container. Cover and let rise until doubled.

Tip dough out on to floured board. Divide in half and shape two loaves.

Dust the loaves with a little flour and cover with a tea towel.
Let rise until almost double..

Heat oven to 375ðF.

Slash loaves and brush with an egg wash. Bake on a stone or on a parchment covered baking sheet for approximately 45 to 50 minutes or until an instant read thermometer reads 200ðF.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 8:46PM
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annie1992

Ann T, that looks perfect, and delicious.

As usual, mine looks nothing like yours. I used your method of wrapping in foil (2 layers of heavy duty) and roasting "low and slow". However, my extremely lean 3 lb. roast came out tough and dry after 4 hours. I was hesitant to cook it longer for tenderness, as it was already dry at that point. If my conversion is correct, your roast should have weighed about 5 pounds, a bit less than twice mine.

I served it with colcannon, whole grain bread and some sautéed cabbage, which was the best part of the meal.

My smallest apprentice helped make corned beef hash today, so that made it worthwhile, although I am not optimistic about the hash either. We'll find out at breakfast, I suppose.

Altogether a very substandard meal with one of my least favorite applications using beef. That would be why I do it once a year, I suppose. Next year maybe we'll have lamb. It's more authentic and at least Elery likes that and it would give me an excuse to just eat the colcannon, which I like a lot.

So, all in all, a meal that I enjoyed very much after I gave the corned beef to the dog!

Annie

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 10:21PM
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ann_t

Annie, I don't know why your meat should have been dry. I can see a layer of fat on the slices in your photo. Looks like your beef might have had more fat than the brisket that I cooked. The brisket I cooked last year, the same way was small. Maybe three pounds.

Love your little helper.

~Ann

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 10:37PM
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trailrunnerbiker

Thank you ann...that sounds lovely !! I always put cocoa in my pumpernickel bread it makes it so rich. Yours is beautiful ! c

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 11:28PM
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annie1992

Ann, there was about 1/4 inch of fat on the top of the brisket. It was the flat portion of the cut, so not as fatty throughout as the point, but still it should have been sufficient.

You can especially see in the second picture that the meat just seemed to dry out, and even cutting against the grain didn't help the texture. (shrug)

It's the third time I've corned my own brisket and the last. It certainly is not worth the effort. Maybe if I loved corned beef......nah, it's not worth the days, the refrigerator space or the ingredients.

Annie

    Bookmark   March 18, 2014 at 11:58PM
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ann_t

Mine was the flat too. This is the only way that I like corned beef cooked. But if I never had it again, I wouldn't miss it. So I would agree that it isn't worth the days, the refrigerator space or the ingredients.

I did enjoy a corned beef sandwich for dinner though. Just enough left for corned beef hash. Maybe for breakfast.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 12:06AM
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jasdip

Your corned beef dinners look good, I only have corned beef piled high on a sandwich with lots of mustard.

Ann, last year you posted your bangers and mash. My mouth waters still thinking of that photo. I didn't do anything for St Patty's day, but I'm craving sausage and gravy and mashed potatoes, so that's what I'm having today, I think
We do love cabbage, so I might throw some cooked cabbage into the potatoes.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 8:42AM
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ann_t

Oh thanks Jasdip, it is early here and now I have a craving for sausage and mashed potatoes.

I love cabbage too. But it isn't a vegetable that I cook often. I need to use it more. I usually buy savoy cabbage. I like the taste and texture.

~Ann

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 10:17AM
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ruthanna_gw

I am not a big fan of corned beef but every couple of years, I succumb to its bargain price around St. Patrick's Day and buy a piece.

Yours looks delicious, Ann, and next year, I will definitely try your method.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 10:43AM
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dcarch7

Ann_t, that looks like pastrami, and I like pastrami better than corned beef. Wonderful St. Pat's dinner!

dcarch

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 1:49PM
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ann_t

DC, I like pastrami better than corned beef too. I miss that fact that we don't have any Jewish Delis around here.

Finished up the last of the corned brisket this morning. Made Moe corned beef hash for breakfast.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 3:51PM
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jasdip

We had sausages and mashed potatoes and cabbage, thanks to your bangers and mash, that I couldn't get out of my head, Ann.

And does your hash ever look good!!! Is that French toast with it? I would love just the hash and poached eggs alone.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 7:14PM
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annie1992

Yum, that looks good, I like corned beef hash far better than I do corned beef.

I'm betting that is rye toast with the hash and eggs....

Annie

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 9:55PM
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ann_t

Jasdip, Annie is right. It is toasted rye bread.

~Ann

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 10:13PM
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mitchdesj

ah Ann, I"m making a bee line for Lester's in Montreal next week when I am in Montreal, that sandwich is calling my name, and all your variations look good.

    Bookmark   March 20, 2014 at 10:03AM
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sleevendog

That looks really good. I did the same method. Low and slow. I did make a spice mix that i ground for a dry rub. Cooked at 225.
I do make a brisket at least once a summer on the smoker, keep it in the foil for most of the slow cooking and open the foil for the last hour to get the smoked flavor...and use a spicier texas style rub.
This is a good quick on page primer for brisket i referred to. I was looking for an internal temp to shoot for. On the smoker i just wing it.

Here is a link that might be useful: cooking temp for brisket

    Bookmark   March 20, 2014 at 12:54PM
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