home mini dance floor

minus-touchJuly 16, 2014

I'd like to convert my family room (200 sq ft) into a mini dance floor. It is currently carpeted. The next room is a kitchen with no door, threshold, railings in between. The kitchen has 3/4 inch hardwood floor. The subfloor is plywood, above a dirt crawlspace.

What is the best type of floor to put in the family room for this purpose? A dance floor need to have some give, or cushioning to make it more comfortable to dance on. I think some sort of engineered wood floor with a shock absorbing underlayment would do it.

Ideally, the new dance floor would butt against the kitchen floor with no gaps, molding, or height differences. This seems to rule out a floating floor. A glued floor with padding does not expand/contract as much, is it possible to glue the floor with one side butt against the kitchen floor and have expansion gaps on only the remaining three sides? Even if this works, I heard a glued floor feels more solid than a floating floor, so does that largely defeats the purpose of having a padding? There's also the worry of how to remove this glued down floor when the time comes...

Any comments or bright ideas?

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pprioroh

Dance as in ballet or formal dance, or dance as in party / boogie down dance.. :)

    Bookmark   July 18, 2014 at 2:10PM
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minus-touch

Ballroom

    Bookmark   July 18, 2014 at 6:05PM
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phidauex

I would recommend trying a full floating laminate floor. They aren't as "nice" as many other floors, but they have a few features that would be nice for a dancefloor: a very consistent surface, nice "give" for dancing, and inexpensive so you won't be too bent out of shape if someone forgets to take off their tap heels before taking a turn. ;)

The floor thickness would need to be compared to your kitchen floor, but there are very low-profile T-molding sections that can adjust to a slight height difference. There are also different thicknesses of underlayment, but even a mid-thickness underlayment makes for a floor with a comfortable spring. They don't attach to the floor or any of the walls, so easy to make changes in the future if you want to.

    Bookmark   July 21, 2014 at 6:40PM
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