Ring after Cleaning a Stain

betsyhacJuly 5, 2009

Because I was in a hurry, I cleaned up a cat yack spot on my newly recovered couch cushion w/o checking fabric content first. Spot's gone, but now there's a big water ring. Fabric is 51% polyester, 30% rayon, 19% cotton and has an S cleaning code. Any advice as to what should I do or use now to get rid of it? Thank you!

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thecollector

If you used water to clean the stain, you set the ring. Its there to stay.

Cleaning cods "S" is dry cleaning fluids only. No water.

    Bookmark   July 5, 2009 at 10:30AM
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bobismyuncle

One can carefully water clean _most_ S coded fabrics. Rayon is often an exception and so is cotton. What you are seeing _may_ be simply a color shift in the spot area, or it could be that "yack" acids has bleached the color. The first thing I would have done was to clean "seam-to-seam" to avoid an obviously cleaned spot. At this point, you can't do much worse. Don't kick yourself too much because S cleaners would probably not have removed the cat yack. Thus les jeux sont fait at the moment of the yacking.

Here is a link that might be useful: Cleaning chenille

    Bookmark   July 5, 2009 at 3:30PM
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betsyhac

Thank you Bobsmyuncle for weighing in! (I've clipped several of your posts).
In further research, I've found suggestions for using rubbing alcohol and a blow dryer, and also for using baby wipes (assuming it's the alcohol again). What do you think?

    Bookmark   July 7, 2009 at 10:52AM
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betsyhac

By the way bobsmyuncle ... Je n'abandonnerai pas!!

    Bookmark   July 7, 2009 at 10:54AM
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bobismyuncle

First rule of solvents: Likes dissolve likes.

For water-based stains (food, beverage, etc.), water is best to clean. Technically, water, the universal solvent, is "polar" meaning it has a positive side and a negative side and attracts like material.

For greasy stains (ink, lipstick, motor oil, etc.), you need a hydrocarbon cleaner,. These are non-polar. Sometimes water and a surfactant (detergent) will do the job as the surfactant has a hydrophilic (water loving) side and a hydrophobic (water hating) side. Thus it bridges the gap.

Alcohols are very selective solvents. They work well for some things (think alcohol-based hair spray on fresh ink stains) and not at all for others. I don't know whether the yack is alcohol-soluble or not. I normally use a water-based enzyme cleaner for these. The enzyme breaks up the proteins. If needed, I'll follow up with an oxidizing organic stain remover (hydrogen peroxide and a catalyst).

Chemistry of cleaning.

[end of chemistry lesson]

Sometimes you just need to start gentle and kick it up a notch at a time until something works.

But for any stain that I've used water on, once I get the stain out, I clean "seam-to-seam" to avoid ringing stains or stains that are actually simply "clean spots."

    Bookmark   July 7, 2009 at 7:20PM
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bobismyuncle

oh, and I would avoid extreme heat as it can set some stains.

    Bookmark   July 7, 2009 at 7:22PM
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