Buying as new TV

blue_fastbackDecember 4, 2006

I am looking at new TV's and need to know what resolution means. For exampleone 42" TV HAS A 1024 x 768 resolution and one has a 1280 x 720 resolution. Is the second TV going to have a better picture? Any other things I should know about buying a TV?

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steve_o

There's lots to know about buying a TV, especially when there are so many standards for resolution: HDTV, EDTV, etc.

To answer your specific question, in a word, maybe. It depends on several factors, including contrast ratio (how wide is the difference between light colors and dark; higher ratios are better?); response time (slower response times [larger numbers] can make quickly-moving objects seem fuzzy or jagged); viewing angle (some screens will give you a good picture anywhere you sit; others show the best picture only in a relatively narrow angle); signal source (cheapo VCR or HD cable); and more.

There really isn't room for a tutorial here; if I were you, I would use Google or Yahoo! or such to search for TV buying guides and read up. There's a lot out there.

    Bookmark   December 5, 2006 at 9:04AM
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rayfromalaska

Just give Crutchfield a call, and ask one of the technicians. However, you can find that sort of information in their catalog. I believe that a larger screen requires a higher resolution to match a smaller size screen.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2006 at 6:16PM
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joe_mn

almost all lcd/plasma are HD capable tv's now. yes, some are ED but most are HD. the price swing is enormous though. why is there a $500 27" lcd and a $1000 lcd model side by side? look at the label on the bottom of the set. polaroid/ilo/sharp are cheaper and sony/pioneer/jvc are expensive. what are you paying more for? marketing/tv ads? maybe. quality? who knows? go by your eyes. does the cheap set look ok? it will probably die in 3-4 yrs anyway so why buy the expensive stuff?

    Bookmark   December 10, 2006 at 12:08PM
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jdbillp

Time has shown that the good TV's don't tend to die in 3-4 years.

Repair trends show LCD and Plasma TV's have a HIGHER reliability than the CRT TV's they are quickly replacing.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2006 at 6:50PM
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blinddog

I checked out the Crutchfield tutorial, Wow some great info there. Just go to Crutchfield.com. Thanks to rayfromalaska.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2006 at 8:19PM
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rayfromalaska

Thanks, blinddog.

They are the best when it comes to getting free information on automobile audio for "do it yourself" folks. They provide a free set of installation instructions, and often provide the DIN tools (a stainless horseshoe-shape tools) use to remove the old radio. In addition, if you have any questions relating to the installation, all you have to do is to give them a call and they take you through the steps needed.

I just bought a 32" Sony LCD TV from them. It was on sale (this and this and next week), and the shipping was free, even though I live in Alaska. Larger than 32" TV delivery is not free, however. They threw-in a set of component video cables free of charge, too.

    Bookmark   December 15, 2006 at 1:29AM
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