green potatoes?

vacuumfreakJanuary 25, 2011

I am in the middle (more like beginning!) of chopping some vegetables to put in some butternut squash soup and as I was peeling the potato, I noticed there was green under the skin. Since I'd never seen this before, I googled it and half the people say it's toxic to eat a "green potato", and others say it's OK. I bought 6 and haven't peeled the rest, so I hope they aren't all like that. At first I wondered if it just wasn't ripe, and then I wondered if potatoes even need to ripen, I don't know!!! I'm going to throw it out and try the next one see how it is. So, what do you guys think? How did I live to be 27 and never see a green potato before?

If you don't see a thread about butternut squash soup tomorrow, you'll know all my potatoes were green and I was too tired to go the store to get more!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ritaotay

Potatoes are brown ( red ) when they start out and they turn green from being left in the sunshine... Cut the green off and you can eat the rest...

I've hear the same thing about the green and really don't know for sure if it's toxic or not... I just won't eat it... I'm old fashion, the inside of the potatoes are supposed to be white... lol

Hugs,
Rita

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 1:05AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sooz

Our potatoes have green just under the skin too. We just peel off the skin/green parts and use the white. Of course, if we're making baked potatoes, we leave the skin on and when we load 'em up, I don't notice the green anymore. Go figure, huh?

Looking forward to your soup thread tomorrow :O)

Smiles,
Sooz

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 2:55AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
beachlily z9a

We don't get good potatoes down here at this time of year, do we Bobby? I just cut the green off too. I found a bag of Yukon Golds (5 lb, $2) at the farmers market--no green, no spots. Didn't know what to do!

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 8:13AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac

The green is a toxic chemical, solanin. Its' also produced in the leaves and in the sprouts....
Yes, toxic but not very....besides it's bitter!
Cut the green part off and eat the rest....if you doubt that you have cut off enough taste the potato...if it's bitter, cut off more.
It's very unlikely that any bit of green you find on an otherwise fine potato will hurt you....but it won't taste good.
Linda C

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 8:59AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sherrmann

I can't tell the difference. I have a whole bag of russets with green under the skin and just peeled one to taste. I can't detect any bitterness in the raw green part; it tastes exactly like the white part. Hub agrees with me (and this little experiment gave him even more proof that his wife is nuts!) I've eaten the green, when it's there, all my life, baked, fried, mashed.

Holy Moly! I wonder if THAT's why I had kidney cancer!

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 10:56AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ann_t

I usually buy 10 pound bags of russet potatoes and I look closely to make sure that the potatoes aren't green.

I have a large basket that is lined with a brown paper bag and I dump the potatoes out of the plastic bag and into the paper bag. You want to keep the potatoes out of the light. This prevents them from turning green.

Like Rita, I won't eat green potatoes.

Ann

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 11:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
work_in_progress_08

Have had the "green" potato problem and just cut away the green. Used them for mashed potatoes on Sunday and no one has been sick. If they were really green I think I might discard, but these just had a bit of a green hue right under the skin, not into the potato.

Not sure I would have been brave enough to use them for baked potatoes tho:P

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 11:18AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
annie1992

I agree, the green is from exposure to the sun, and it's mildly toxic to those who are sensitive to it. I find the green portions bitter tasting and so I cut the green portions off and cook the rest of the potato.

And I've been cutting the green off homegrown potatoes my whole life, it happens if a potato sticks up out of the ground while it's growing but we were always far too frugal to throw away a perfectly good potato. Just cut the green off and cook it!

Annie

Annie

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 2:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Cynic

I avoid them but laugh at the people saying they're toxic when we've all seen green potato chips!

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 10:57PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
annie1992

cynic, the green is MILDLY toxic, but a 100 pound person would have to eat at least a pound of fully green potato to feel any ill efffects at all. Solanine can cause headaches and nausea, if taken in high enough amounts, but the green is actually chlorophyll, which is harmless to eat.

Potatoes produce a small amount of solanine naturally to repel pests. The green caused by chlorophyll is just an indicator that the solanine level is higher too, because solanine is produced at the same time the chlorophyll is.

So, you'd have to eat a LOT of green potato chips, and they'd have to be ALL green, not just green around the edges, before you'd even have a chance of getting sick.

So, another urban legend that has roots in the truth, but the green part is still bitter, and I'm not eating it if it doesn't taste good.

Annie

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 9:46AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canarybird01

One old Canarian gardener I had at the time when I grew my own potatoes insisted that they be kept out of the moonlight as well as sunlight when we were storing them in the garden shed, which has a window. He insisted that even moonlight would turn them green. I still doubt that.

But potatoes belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, as are tomatoes, petunias, eggplant, nicotine, sweet and hot peppers, datura, and the alkaloids in them can range from mildly to extremely toxic.

SharonCb

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 10:11AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ann_t

I agree Annie, the green part is bitter and I won't eat green potato chips either not because I'm afraid of being poisoned but just because they don't taste good.

Ann

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 10:12AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Rusty

Bobby, it is just short of amazing,
that you've not seen a green potato before now.
It's often hard to find any that DON'T have green, here.

"But potatoes belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, as are tomatoes, petunias, eggplant, nicotine, sweet and hot peppers, datura, and the alkaloids in them can range from mildly to extremely toxic."

Yes, and different people have different levels of sensitivity to them.
I find that eating tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, & peppers
really intensifies Arthritis pain.
And if I eat a potato that has green on it,
it is even worse.

Like some others here,
I definitely do NOT eat potato chips that are green,
or partially green.
And I cut green off of potatoes when cooking, too.

In fact, I eat very little of any of the Nightshade family.
For the most part, it just isn't worth it!
Yet I know of others who aren't bothered by them at all.

Go figure.

Rusty

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 11:10AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Does this Nutella frosting on my cake need to be refrigerated?
I finally found a Nutella frosting recipe that I really...
sooz
What's For Dinner #337
Annie, you and Elery are doing a wonderful job on the...
ann_t
Curry (I think) flavored coffee cake
My boss's friend shared a coffee cake, or fruit cake...
sally2_gw
Once it was so easy..............................
To find whatever one wanted quickly. Now everything...
Robert Givens
Question for Grainlady or other good bakers
My daughter-in-law has recently developed gluten intolerance--she...
laceyvail
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™