Anyone have a good adjustable cheese slicer?

shamboJanuary 22, 2014

A gadget, not a knife. I've got one that looks like the the one in the link. It works just fine. I think I've had it since before I married, so it must be over 40 years old. I'm just looking for a backup. I have no idea where I got the one I'm currently using, and there are no distinguishing brand name markings on it either. Perhaps there's something better out there, so if you've got a good slicer, could you tell me about it?

Here is a link that might be useful: Adjustable cheese slicer

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nancedar

Saw this one on Amazon - looks like yours only newer LOL. They also have others that have the adjustments on the wire ends, not on the handle, same principle, different design.
Nancy

Here is a link that might be useful: Adjustable Cheese Slicer

    Bookmark   January 24, 2014 at 7:53AM
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arkansas_girl

If you have a kitchen gadget store in the mall, they should have one like the one on Amazon. I have one similar to that and I got it at the mall kitchen gadget store. If you live near an outlet mall, those stores with kitchen stuff also have them. They aren't that hard to find. I bet even Bed Bath and Beyond has them, don't forget your coupon! ;)

    Bookmark   January 24, 2014 at 8:27AM
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dcarch7

It is not surprising that I use tools for tasks which they are not intended for.

I use a carpenter's wood plane to slice/peel cheese. It is adjustable and can shave the thinnest slivers of cheese.

dcarch

    Bookmark   January 24, 2014 at 10:10AM
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publickman

I generally use a vegetable peeler for slicing cheese (small pieces only), or else a mandolin or my electric meat slicer, which is the most adjustable, although the reviews say that one is not supposed to use it for that. It does put some noticeable stress on the motor, but I never slice that much at one time. I buy Provolone and Swiss cheeses already sliced, if I want it for sandwiches.

Lars

    Bookmark   January 24, 2014 at 2:41PM
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shambo

DC, the idea of a wood plane actually sounds intriguing. Does it hold up to washing? Lars, I'm going to give the vegetable peeler idea a try. I'm with you about buying pre-sliced Swiss & Provolone. Actually, I buy the sliced Swiss for sandwiches and then use my food processor to shred a block of Swiss that I keep in the freezer. When I use grated cheese, I combine the naturally low sodium Swiss with Cheddar or Mozzarella. However, if I use fresh mozz, it's so low in sodium that I don't have to combine it with anything else.

Thanks for your ideas. Maybe a trip to Bed, Bath, & Beyond is on the agenda. Otherwise, I could order the one from Amazon.

    Bookmark   January 24, 2014 at 4:27PM
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dcarch7

Shambo, a wood plane can shave very thin cheese, thinner than paper, very interesting for garnishing presentation.

You can also use it to shave frozen meat, for whatever recipes you can think of (beef carpaccio?).

The only thing to consider is this, you have to clean and dry the plane immediately because the blade can rust.

dcarch

This post was edited by dcarch on Sat, Jan 25, 14 at 10:54

    Bookmark   January 25, 2014 at 8:31AM
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Bellsmom

dcarch--
Intrigued, I checked Amazon for wood planes. For some reason, my husband, who has several, will not give me one to cut cheese. The look on his face was priceless!!

I have no idea which one or what kind would work best.
What style? How wide?

Not sure I'm tempted, but I am curious.

Any further info or suggestions?

    Bookmark   January 25, 2014 at 11:15AM
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dcarch7

Here are pictures of what can a wood worker's plane do.

You can shave very thin (adjustable) slivers of cheese,

And you can shave meat to transparent thin, which is great for tough cuts of meat.

dcarch

    Bookmark   January 26, 2014 at 8:00AM
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chas045

Re: woodworker's plane; dcarch neglected to mention that he was using a Block plane (if you want to know what to ask for). Fortunately, they are less expensive than jack planes, which are the longer wider ones. However, I think if you have a mandolin, you could stick with it and not have to worry about cleaning and quickly drying the blade and sole (the base).

    Bookmark   January 26, 2014 at 7:40PM
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