Possible to get back to early adulthood weight?

squirrelspurJuly 23, 2008

Now that I am entering menopause (late 40s) I would love to get back to my early adulthood weight. I am not overweight according to the BMI tables etc. and have managed to lose about 7 lbs. over the past year through changing diet (cutting back on certain high calories foods/snacks) and regular exercise, not following a particular diet as I am not that kind of person who can do that. But these last 8-10 lbs. are the hardest!

Has anyone been able to get back to what they weighed in their 20s and how did you do it? I exercise each day 30 minutes doing power walking.

I'm mainly interested in this for health reasons - reports saying that after menopause those extra pounds may affect one's cancer rate.

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paulah-gardener

do you drink 8 or more glasses of water a day ? this could help. paula

    Bookmark   July 28, 2008 at 7:54AM
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mcpeg

I am still working on the last 10 pounds myself. Use a lunch sized plate, eat a balanced diet and keep moving. My laziness revolves around not enough fruit and veggies in my day. So when I up those and reduce the volume of breads/meats my weight loss starts to move. Drinking more water helps my body flush too and makes a noticeable difference. I don't expect major scale drops - it's been very slow but every ounce, pound does add up to moving back down the scale over the long haul.
Good luck with your journey,
McPeg

    Bookmark   August 21, 2008 at 10:26AM
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haus_proud

I have found that eating fish helps -- fresh filet, about 6 oz. tends to be very satisfying and I think it is lower in calories and/or fat than an equivalent amount of meat. I bake or broil it, so I use very little fat, just a little bit of olive oil.

But I agree with the other suggestions -- move around a lot. I'm not sure what power walking is like, but if it involves some weight/resistance training, that's good too.

I also think one should not take the association between slight overweight and cancer too literally, because they don't really know what that means. It may not be a cause-effect relationship. That does not mean you shouldn't lose those extra pounds -- just don't worry too much about dire long-term consequences.

    Bookmark   October 11, 2008 at 11:42PM
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wildchild

It really depends on how thin you were in your twenties. What may look good on a younger person may not look so great on a mid-life one. If I went down to what I weighed in my twenties I would look like a wrinkled cadaver. I'm trying to get down to my mid-thirties weight I achieved the first time I did Weight Watchers. ( I gained a humongous amount of weight having children and it did not come off until then).

Today I find that I have to be at the top of the WW watchers range or I start looking like someone battling an illness. That weight is a good 35 pounds higher than my "hard body" weight in my twenties before kids.

Actually there are several studies out now that say a bit of extra weight is a good thing for us as we get older. If you get ill and are too thin you have no reserves to get through a severe illness like cancer.

Remember too that if you are moving and building muscle you will weigh more. Just take a look around at the teeny tiny teens with soft bellies and no muscle tone. They may weigh only 90 lbs. but they aren't healthy.

    Bookmark   October 12, 2008 at 8:37AM
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