Tile transition: mudroom to bathroom

coffeehausOctober 13, 2008

We'll have floor tile in our laundry/mudroom with a small bath adjacent. If I use the same tile in my mudroom that I use in the adjoining kitchen, which I expect will be sized at least 12 inches square, then what size to use on the bath floor? It seems to me that large tiles would be inappropriate, but how do you finesse the transition from largish tiles in the kitchen/laundry/mudroom to smaller tiles in the bath? Just use the same color, but scaled down in size? Would it look disjointed to use a different color in the bath?

TIA!

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stinkytiger

Hi,

We have a small bath off our mudroom. We just use the same identical tile (12 inches square). The transition at the door between mudroom and bathroom is seamless, just keep laying the tile as per normal.

Turned out OK for us.

Best, Mike.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2008 at 6:44AM
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bevangel_i_h8_h0uzz

Friend of mine has a 5' x 5' powder-room tiled with 16" tile laid on a diagonal. It looks terrific. Somehow the large tile actually makes her powder-room seem larger. Maybe it's because there are fewer grout lines so it is less "busy" looking.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2008 at 10:17AM
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chisue

Our back hall and powder room are the same 13-inch 'limestone-look' porcelain tile. Setting tile on the diagonal does visually 'stretch' a room. I didn't do it there because I wanted it to look more Old World.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2008 at 10:47AM
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chapnc

My 16 inch tiles continue right into my powder room (5 ft x 5 ft). Looks great.

You don't need smaller tiles just because the room is smaller. Keeping the same size looks better and works better too; you don't have to worry about a transition. I think transitioning to a smaller tile would look jarring where the 2 tiles meet. Keep it all the same size and same tile for a clean, continuous look.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2008 at 11:07AM
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micahjo

Ditto.

We have 12" slate tiles that run from the mudroom straight into the bath. I love it because the slate is roughed enough to handle all the dirt yet elegant enough for me to use that bath as an nice powder room for parties.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2008 at 4:50PM
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coffeehaus

Thanks, everyone! So, that's unanimous for continuing with the larger tiles...makes sense. I was basing my "smaller tile" theory on something that I had read about using smaller tiles for better traction in the bath because you have more grout, but maybe I had it confused with shower tile. Using the same tile simplifies my decision-making. Now, I just have to decide WHICH tile!

    Bookmark   October 14, 2008 at 7:35PM
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bevangel_i_h8_h0uzz

A powder-room floor isn't very likely to be wet (well, one hopes not anyway!) so slipping shouldn't be much of a worry. If you're concerned, you can choose tiles that have a higher "coefficient of friction."

Coefficient of Friction is a measure of slipperyness and ranges (in theory) from 0 to 1. Zero would mean no friction at all while 1 would be mean you couldn't slide against the surface at all no matter how hard you tried. For comparison, rubber tires on dry road surfaces experience a COF of about 0.7 to 0.8 but when the roads are wet the COF drops to around 0.4. Wet ice can have a COF of 0.1 or even lower.

For a shower floor, I would look for a tile with a wet COF of at least 0.6 or else use 1x1 or 2x2 mosaic tiles so that the COF of grout is more important than the COF of the tiles. Even with 1x1 mosaics though, if the tile is very slippery, you can wind up with a very slippery shower floor.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2008 at 1:12PM
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bevangel_i_h8_h0uzz

A powder-room floor isn't very likely to be wet (well, one hopes not anyway!) so slipping shouldn't be much of a worry. If you're concerned, you can choose tiles that have a higher "coefficient of friction."

Coefficient of Friction is a measure of slipperyness and ranges (in theory) from 0 to 1. Zero would mean no friction at all while 1 would be mean you couldn't slide against the surface at all no matter how hard you tried. For comparison, rubber tires on dry road surfaces experience a COF of about 0.7 to 0.8 but when the roads are wet the COF drops to around 0.4. Wet ice can have a COF of 0.1 or even lower.

For a shower floor, I would look for a tile with a wet COF of at least 0.6 or else use 1x1 or 2x2 mosaic tiles so that the COF of grout is more important than the COF of the tiles. Even with 1x1 mosaics though, if the tile is very slippery, you can wind up with a very slippery shower floor.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2008 at 2:13PM
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