Recessing flat screen TV into wall

capejohnOctober 22, 2009

Not sure this is the correct forum for this question, but thought I'd give it a try. For my new build (interior walls are still not sheetrocked) i'd like to recess a flat screen TV into the wall, so the screen is basically flush with the sheetrock, once the walls are finished. Can this be done.. any ideas on how to go about doing this? One thing I'm concerned with is heat build up in the wall. Would it need to be open on the other side of the wall.... anyone have any experience with this?

Thanks very much.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
allison0704

I've linked (below) our TV that is recessed. DH found the tv he wanted to purchased and built the niche to accept it. He left several inches all around (picture is a bit deceiving, mantle is 6ft tall) for heat to escape. We've been in 4 years and haven't had any problems.

It's not open on the back, just left space around the TV for air flow. They sell fans for TVs and/or equipment if you want the wall to come all the way to the TV....but this may cause problems in the future when you need to replace TV.

Also be sure niche is deep enough to hold TV and the holder.

Here is a link that might be useful: our tv

    Bookmark   October 22, 2009 at 8:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

The drywall is only 1/2 inch thick, so that alone os not enough depth.

You can frame the opening with a header and easily create a pocket 3 inches deep.

Any decent carpenter should have no problem if you give the the dimensions.

A non-weight bearing wall is very simple.

Weight bearing will need a header to support the load above.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2009 at 9:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
iamsum

i would advice it for a couple of reasons, but mostly because of what you already said. Heat would be an issue i would assume. Secondly if you ever need access to the side of the tv or rear you won't have it if it's recessed. I would just get a samsung 1.2" tv and a low profile mount, it won't stick out more than 2-3 inches off the wall.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2009 at 11:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
david_cary

Heat is not really an issue with an Led TV. Even LCD are very cool running. Don't try it with a Plasma. I might spend a few extra bucks on a swing out mount to make the wiring easier - I just picked up a swing out for $35 as opposed to $20 for a fixed mount.

The niche is easy to create. My builder would warn something about future proofing when the TV dies and they don't make that size anymore.

Now I'm just mad that I didn't do this. In the living room, we are in a built-in so that is basically recessed. But in the bedroom, it would have been slick....

    Bookmark   October 23, 2009 at 4:31AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
srercrcr

What are you people gonna do when the Tv has to be replaced and its dimensions are different?

    Bookmark   October 23, 2009 at 7:29AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
alabamanicole

Build a recess in the wall. Mount TV. Build a "frame" for the TV so it appears to be a custom built-in. It can be vented if desired, of solid contruction, made from speaker fabric stretched over a frame, or...

When you replace the TV, you'll probably need to create a new frame, but at least you won't have to mess with the wall.

    Bookmark   October 23, 2009 at 9:10AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
phillipeh

In our build, we had the contractor construct a recess above the FP (14"D x 55"W x 48"H) and include a cable connection and electrical outlet on the rear wall of the recess. We put a 52" LCD TV in and it looks really nice. We hid all the components in a closet behind the FP.

Same in the master bedroom: niche above the FP, only slightly smaller as it holds a smaller TV.

You can mount the TV on the rear wall of the niche or use the stand that comes with the TV.

    Bookmark   October 23, 2009 at 9:56AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
allison0704

What are you people gonna do when the Tv has to be replaced and its dimensions are different?

Actually, we have a 4yo 42" tv in our niche. Now, we could be a 46" tv that would fit.

I would suggested a niche that is at least 5-6 inches deep. Reason being, you not only have to have depth for the tv itself, but for any measurement added due to tilting. Even if just a tad tilted.

Ours, when slightly tilted is just at the front of niche. The guy who made the sliding cover I designed took everything into consideration.

If for some reason we cannot put a tv in the niche in the future (I don't really see manufacturers going back to deep tvs), then the cover will just act as "art."

In the lower right, you can see a little black thing. That is the "eye" for the remote that runs everything - which is stored in the equipment niche to the right of the FP. I had the same guys build the door for that niche from an old shutter. It holds all the necessary TV/DISH equipment and has shelves for DVDs.

*Advice* Run an extra set of cables during construction in case the original is blown by lightning. We did this at the installers advice. Also have extra wire running to the DISH location. Much easier now than later!

Here is a link that might be useful: our tv

    Bookmark   October 23, 2009 at 10:20AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terry_t

This is easy and just takes a little extra planning. Allison has pretty much described what happens in commercial applications such as what I was involved with in conference rooms. It really comes down to what is behind the wall you want to place the TV into. Otherwise, you can easily build the niche to the required size. You can build the niche framing bigger and finish it to accommodate your current TV (just figure the opening size on standard 16:9 aspect ratios for flat screens). TV manufacturers can provide clearances for natural cooling or a small very quiet fan can be flush mounted inside the niche.

I recommend installing a TVSS (transient voltage surge suppressor) receptacle in the niche to save space and eliminate the need for a power strip. Also, it is never a bad idea to run extra cabling but all cabling should be surge protected as close to their entry into the house as possible.

    Bookmark   October 26, 2009 at 3:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
echo2400

Look at the samsung led 1 1/2" thick tv's, the led runs a lot cooler than the lcd

    Bookmark   November 18, 2009 at 11:44PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
swampwiz

What happens when the price for 8' wide TV's get to be $1K? Won't DH want to get that TV? A recessed area is like a home entertainment center - you're stuck with the TV that fit in it.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 12:15AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
macv

Properly size the TV for the room so there will not be a reason to make it larger later.

The design below worked well with extension arms. The speakers were supposed to be attached to the bottom of the screen but ended up at the bottom of the recess.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 8:12AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

"I would suggested a niche that is at least 5-6 inches deep."

Residential walls are normally built using 2x4 studs, so there is only 3.5 inches of space available inside the wall.

If you have drywall at the back of the niche on the TV side you have 3.5 inches.
If you omit the extra layer at the back of the niche you have 4 inches from the face of the drywall in the TV room.

"5-6 inches" is going to come from somewhere, and reduce room size on one side of the wall or the other.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 9:27AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
macv

You will have to decide where the 2" is most useful which is just another design decision.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 10:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
2ajsmama

david_cary - where did you find a wall mount for so little $$? DH and I are buying a 42" plasma (about 50 lbs) and I'm having trouble finding a tilting (not even full-motion) wall mount for much less than $100 (US).

Then I have to do a channel cover and paint to hide cords to DVD player and power below, since I plan on using the coffee table (18" high - haven't figured out yet what height to mount TV) for DVD player (and maybe DH will want to buy surround sound) since I just have it shoved up against a different wall right now - the kids like to sit on floor in front of sofa so I can't put table or ottoman there. This is exterior wall so don't want to fish wires through insulation.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 2:33PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
iamsum

ajsmama, check out monoprice.com they have high quality stuff for great prices. im just a happy customer by the way, not affiliated with them.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 6:10PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
allison0704

Residential walls are normally built using 2x4 studs, so there is only 3.5 inches of space available inside the wall.

Isn't a problem when the TV is over the FP...as you can see in link provided in my previous post. Not a problem if it's not over FP if you plan ahead.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 7:34PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
2ajsmama

Thanks david_cary - wow, they have a lot of choices and all about $100 less than Best Buy etc. Which mount do you have? How big is your TV? I was looking at "Ultra Slim" mount which is 1.81" from wall (I've seen them about 1/2" that's too close to tilt), was thinking that might be good but making connections and tightening bolts seems to be a pain. I *do* have small hands. What do you think?

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 7:53AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

"Not a problem if it's not over FP if you plan ahead."

If you are building new, almost any change like this would not be difficult, but you are going to give up space in the rooms involved by having to build something as thick (or thicker) than a wet wall.

While wet walls are usually required somewhere in two story construction (and not in single story) you will loose some usable square footage to the thicker wall.
Depending on the room dimensions involved it can be anything from 'who cares' to a decent chunk of space and volume.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 8:53AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Protecting hardie from splash up?
Our builder is wanting us to add a few layers of brick...
akaypick
Small things that get forgotten
I keep hearing that most people find that there are...
auroraborelis
After building....items you wish you would have thought of..
Hello, for those of you that built a house. After...
einajr
Floorplan advice
We are a family of 4 with 2 young kids ages 3 and 10...
Butternut
Window/door trim thickness---not width
Time to specify our interior trimwork. I'm stymied...
pinktoes
Sponsored Products
Contempora Recessed Medicine Cabinet - Stainless Steel
Signature Hardware
Line Voltage Gimble Ring 763 Track Head by WAC Lighting
$22.50 | Lumens
Floor Cleaning Set
$99.50 | FRONTGATE
Dayton Birch Sable Dark Stained Wood Shaker Kitchen Cabinet Sample
CliqStudios Cabinets
Halo Recessed Lighting 4 in. Recessed Tuscan Bronze Pinhole Trim 990TBZ
$58.00 | Home Depot
3 Watt LED Recessed Light Fixture - Aimable and Dimmable
Super Bright LEDs
Serena & Lily Harbour Cane Bed
Serena & Lily
Low Voltage 856 Track Head by WAC Lighting
$72.00 | Lumens
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™