Removing Teflon from Cast Iron

cooksnsewsMarch 13, 2010

In 1988, I bought a Le Crueset frying pan with a non-stick interior. I didn't know much about caring for such surfaces then, nor did I know about the health concerns of deteriorating teflon. This coating is now quite chipped and peeled. I haven't used it for many years now, and would pitch it, except, it's a Le Crueset and I paid a LOT for it.

So, can anyone suggest a way to strip the remaining coating entirely from the base so I can season it and use it as a plain cast iron pan? I'm wondering if sand- or bead-blasting would do the job, or if there may be a simpler DIY solution?

Thanks.

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lindac

I don't know that Le Cruset ever used a teflon coating....their "non stick" was simple a very fine porcelain enamel on the cast iron.
If that's what you have, no need to strip the coating.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2010 at 8:20PM
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cooksnsews

This coating is peeling, so I don't think it is porcelain. Sure looks like teflon to me.

I've been a bit busy lately to tackle this one, but a friend does have a DIY sandblaster that he is eager to test out on this pan. Then we will polish it with a steel-brush rotary attachment. Respiratory protection will be used.

    Bookmark   April 12, 2010 at 11:08PM
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cooksnsews

Well, it's taken most of the spring and summer, but I finally set up a play day with my pal with the sandblasting kit. It works. A fine grit silica sand got the offending teflon off, although it took us quite awhile to get the machinery optimized. Tomorrow, my friend plans to pick up a water-trap for his compressors, since we ended up with a few jams due to moisture entrainment.

A switch to a coarser sand, and I attacked another pan that I picked up a few weeks ago at a "junk-tique" shop. I think it is a vintage piece, as it is much lighter and thinner than the LC or any of my other modern CI pans. It was coated with a mass of strange gunk, the most persistent of which turned out to be the remnants of an enamel coating. I'll finish with an application of the fine sand to finish up, which will hopefully give a rather polished surface that will season easily. I was surprised to see that clean blasted cast iron is actually silver coloured!

Otherwise, I feel like I've spent a long day at the beach. I have sand EVERYWHERE!

    Bookmark   September 2, 2010 at 8:36PM
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muspic

Not sure if i should be telling you this at this point but for what it is worth .........

apparently Le creuset has a lifetime warranty.
I know of someone who had a 20 year old pot replaced.

    Bookmark   October 11, 2010 at 12:11AM
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cooksnsews

Oh goody! I have several other pieces, purchased at the same time, also with damaged teflon. Who do I contact???

    Bookmark   October 11, 2010 at 7:07PM
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cooksnsews

I just looked up at the LC website and there is this little asterisk clause:

* The lifetime limited warranty does not apply to cookware products with a non-stick coating, non-cast iron pieces and accessories.

Back to the sandblaster......

    Bookmark   October 11, 2010 at 7:12PM
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