What are these utensils called?

claireplymouth z6b coastal MAJanuary 17, 2013

I lived in Germany for a few years in the late '70's and I bought these two cooking utensils without really knowing what they were, except that I thought they'd probably be good for mixing food. At first I just stirred rapidly with them, which worked, but I eventually learned that you can spin them like a propeller if you spin the shaft between your two hands (a German woman mentioned that - she didn't know what they were called).

I still use them for things like mixing powdered milk and water in a refrigerator container. A quick swirl/spin and it's done without pulling out an electric mixer or having to use a bowl with a whisk and then pouring the milk into the refrigerator jar.

I lived for years without knowing what they're called, but now it's annoying me. I tried googling, but all I could find was one picture of a similar utensil in a set of vintage German utensils with no names.

Does anyone know what these utensils are called? At the time I bought cooking spoons of various sizes, all made out of the same plastic-like material and they've all lasted beautifully

Thanks,
Claire

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nancylouise_gw

It looks as if they either could be muddlers for mixing drinks or using for mixing a Mexican hot chocolate drink. I can't think of the name of it right now. But that would be my guesses. NancyLouise

    Bookmark   January 17, 2013 at 3:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
claireplymouth z6b coastal MA

Thanks, NancyLouise. My impression is that these are used in cooking, not in bartending or drink making, but I could be wrong.

Claire

    Bookmark   January 17, 2013 at 4:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
claireplymouth z6b coastal MA

NancyLouise: It may be used for both cooking and mixing drinks.

I've been searching further and found a group of utensils, made of melamine by Rosti, and one of them is called a hand mixer and looks similar though not the same. I also have several of these other utensils from my days in Germany.

Amazon also carries this, in different colors, and calls it a mixing spoon, saying: "This melamine mixing spoon is great for beating eggs or mixing drinks. Rub the mixing spoon between two hands to rapidly spin the mixer back and forth."

So maybe mine are just an older model of a Danish "hand mixer" or "mixing spoon" and there isn't a special name for them.

Claire

This post was edited by claire on Thu, Jan 17, 13 at 17:47

    Bookmark   January 17, 2013 at 5:44PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cookncarpenter

Looks like a modern German version of a "Molinillo" a Mexican wisk used to "bate chocolate"

    Bookmark   February 9, 2013 at 3:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
claireplymouth z6b coastal MA

Thanks, ctycdm! I was stuck without power for a few days due to a blizzard in Massachusetts so I didn't get your email earlier.

I googled 'Molinillo' and apparently it's used by spinning between the palms to create that vortex that makes a good froth if you try hard, just as the German tool is. I found this reference which says the Spaniards brought chocolate and chocolate apparatus back to Europe from Mexico and presumably the Germans happily adopted it.

When I checked Google Images for Molinillo I also found this reference showing a molinillo from India which is used "to make frothy buttermilk and lassis". It's much simpler than those beautiful Mexican wooden tools and is more like my German ones. Mexico does seem to be the source. Chocolate inspires invention! A fine reason to eat or drink chocolate.

Claire

This post was edited by claire on Mon, Feb 11, 13 at 20:08

    Bookmark   February 11, 2013 at 8:06PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
New Viking Cookware
Has anyone tried the new Viking Cookware now being...
katespak
Need advice on a soup pot
hi, I haven't bought cookware in years, so don't know...
ellenr22
Club cast aluminum still made?
I am new to the list, so forgive me if this subject...
joan41
Mauviel m'150s and m'250c
I'm looking at some pans in these two lines -- I understand...
Gooster
Favorite tea kettle for induction?
Waiting patiently for my induction cooktop to be installed....
txjoyce
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™