Exterior materials - HardiePlank, Cedar shakes, Stone and Brick

dpusaAugust 26, 2012

All,

My builder is using a combination of materials on the exterior.

A. HardiePlank on the sides after the brick, back (above the deck),

B. Brick (front, back below the deck and the sides ground up followed by the Hardie plank.

C. Cedar shakes on the front

D. Stone on the front.

I have included some shots of a similar house that the builder built. Questions are the following:

1. What is the longevity of cedar shakes, is painting or staining better?

2. Thoughts on Hardiplank?

3. We can remove the brick on the sides and back (below the deck) and save $6k, and use HardiPlank instead. Thoughts?

Thanks so much

Dylan

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
still_waters

HardiePlank makes a cedar shingle-looking product that will save you the maintenance of cedar shingles.

I really like the look of stone. Personally, I prefer all stone as compared to a brick and stone combo.

    Bookmark   August 26, 2012 at 6:52PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
downsy

I really like the exterior of your inspiration home - our recent new build was similar in style. We used nichiha shake siding, similar to hardie, but comes in wider widths. They are also a concrete based product. We used hardie board and batten, stone and brick in addition to the shakes. We painted the shakes and the b&b. We've only been in our home for 8 months so I can't give you any long term results, but we anticipate and hope for a long lasting paint job.

    Bookmark   August 26, 2012 at 8:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

That sounds like a lot of mixed materials on the house....you may want to eliminate one or more of them. Your inspiration house above is all stone and shakes or shake look a likes.

    Bookmark   August 27, 2012 at 10:23AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
downsy

I really like the exterior of your inspiration home - our recent new build was similar in style. We used nichiha shake siding, similar to hardie, but comes in wider widths. They are also a concrete based product. We used hardie board and batten, stone and brick in addition to the shakes. We painted the shakes and the b&b. We've only been in our home for 8 months so I can't give you any long term results, but we anticipate and hope for a long lasting paint job.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2012 at 4:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dpusa

Thanks for thE feedback. The front elevation is a brick layer in the bottom half followed by cedar shakes and stone. We are just not sure about cedar versus something else such as more brick, or hardi shakes?

    Bookmark   August 29, 2012 at 8:30PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
renovator8

The use of many different materials requires greater skill from the designer to be successful. What may look interesting in rendered drawings is often busy and awkward in reality. And there is the practical issue of how dissimilar materials are joined and made weather tight. This is a much more difficult issue when one material is above another and they are of different thicknesses or distances from the framing. I believe these details are so difficult that it is best to try to avoid them as designers and builders have done for centuries.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2012 at 8:33PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
live_wire_oak

Cutting a house horizontally in half with different materials is a look best left to the production McMansions of the boom. If you are going to choose different materials to accent the build, you should choose elements to clad in it completely. And NEVER do "just the front" of the house in stone or brick with a cheaper material elsewhere. If you are going to use stone or brick, clad the entire box of the structure in that material. The expense of doing correctly like that is why most people choose one of a facade's bumpouts to use that material on and save the less expensive material for the main box. That is what your inpiration photo shows. The stone goes from bottom to top and is on the whole element to be accented, not cutting it in half.

    Bookmark   August 31, 2012 at 11:12AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Savings - basement bar with laminate
Working on finding ways to get closer to our original...
Mini Soda
Are these doors acceptable to you?
These are walnut interior doors. I understand that...
pumpkinhouse
Purchasing Items during build?
For those who have gone through the building process...
njbuilding143
Would you trust a builder to create a blueprint from your own sketch?
We have heard of people building custom without using...
liv2tell
Don Gardner Callaway Plan - anyone have pictures
My wife and I are considering building the Don Gardner...
Scott Carson
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™