Brick vs Hardi Cost - This has to be wrong..

rktmanAugust 29, 2008

Holy cow Batman,

I just got a quote for Hardie Siding Installed, $500 per square (on the back my house only, brick front and sides already done). Why on earth would I pay that when my brick cost was the same? How does this compare with some of your actual costs for cement siding?

Thanks.

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chompskyd

I just priced Hardie lap siding at about $110 a square for primed boards. That's for materials, not installed. So, the estimate does seem high, but I know that around here siding installation costs are ridiculous. I recently got a quote that worked out to $1000/sq, which made me sputter. (I'm in the midwest.) Have you gotten another quote?

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 1:48PM
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rktman

Not yet. I'm in MO. $1000/ sq, that's crazy. I'm still looking for other options.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 2:29PM
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brickeyee

Is it a small job?
One story house and not very large?

There is a certain 'penalty' associated with smaller jobs.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 6:17PM
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robin0919

Something is wrong with those prices! Are you an O/B or going thru a GC? I just got pricing last week from a local sub and he charges $2.00/sf, factory primed, material and labor included. I'm a GC. Material runs approx. $.86/sf.
FYI, brick runs approx. $6.50/sf, material and labor in this area.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 7:58PM
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rktman

Well, I'm only doing 12 square on the back of the house. Brick costs me about $.95 per brick(m&l) X 5 brick per sf. So brick cost per sf= .95x5=$4.75. So at 4.75 per sf x 1200 sf, this is $5700. Using the Hardie quote of $500x12 sq, this is $6000. Unless my math is messed up, Hardie makes no financial sense assuming brick is the superior product.
I may just be getting a high quote. I looked on get-a-quote.net and their estimate was around $275 per square which would be more reasonable.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 8:41PM
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vhehn

should be 7 brick per sq ft. changes the numbers a lot.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 9:15PM
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rktman

King size brick, 5 per sf.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 9:20PM
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robin0919

Do you already have a brick ledge?

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 10:47PM
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mightyanvil

Good point. If there is a ledge you need an expensive flashing detail or furr/flare the siding out and if there isn't you can't install brick.

I wouldn't necessarily consider brick to be the superior material. The overall design of the house is more important. What is your goal? Save money, add interest to the house?

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 8:38AM
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brickeyee

"If there is a ledge you need an expensive flashing detail or furr/flare the siding out and if there isn't you can't install brick."

You can use steel angle bolted to the foundation as a ledge but $$.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 9:27AM
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dixiedoodle

I would consider brick to be a superior material in light of the fact that all other sides of his house have already been bricked. I don't like the switch in materials at the rear...it generally looks like you ran out of $$$ half-way through your project.

Around here almost all homes are built with a brick ledge because the foundations are almost exclusively bricked regardless of the cladding material above.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 10:05AM
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worthy

I don't like the switch in materials at the rear...it generally looks like you ran out of $$$ half-way through your project.

Here, million dollar + homes often feature stone fronts and EIFS for the rest.

When I see all-stone homes, I just know it was a vanity project by the owner who wanted to prove he could afford it. (We did a custom with just that rationale.)

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 1:02PM
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terry_t

Good point worthy, but I still agree with dixie. I am very sensitive to costs but there has to be a better option to the brick front with vinyl sides/back design.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 2:00PM
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robin0919

I think worthy is talking about stucco, not vinyl. It depends on the style of the really, Craftsman style, very popular around here might have 3 or 4 different sidings.
I to, can't stand to see houses built with a brick front and other 3 sides are vinyl.!!!!!

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 7:43PM
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kateskouros

three sides vinyl?

NO. i'm going to say that word ...i can't stop myself

Mc Man... no. i'm going to stop. don't want to start another one of THOSE threads.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 11:49PM
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mightyanvil

An incredibly ugly or an incredibly beautiful house can be built with the same combination of materials. Well designed houses are not simply an assemblage of common shapes and materials; it takes skill to integrate them well.

    Bookmark   September 1, 2008 at 11:56AM
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robin0919

Very true!

    Bookmark   September 2, 2008 at 12:18AM
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meldy_nva

MightyAnvil is oh so right on the need for a great design when dissimilar materials are used.

However, the fact remains that in many areas, especially in the 50's, 60's, and 70's, tract housing seized upon the use of brick or stone fronts with the other sides of vinyl or cheap siding as a method of cutting costs. If one lived in such an area (and is senior enough to remember) then "false fronts" are indeed a sign of elcheapo building while a fully bricked house was a reliable sign of quality construction. Now, that's a lot of years ago, and many good builders [probably including Worthy] are too young to be aware of this sublimal attitude. It may be unfortunate, but I am among those seniors who still consider that a house which is totally brick or stone is superior in exterior construction quality to any other, except for the extremely rare case of superb architural design which deliberately incorporates a mix of exterior materials -- and I have never seen such in the common false-fronted houses.

Sorry, Worthy, but IMO the fact that someone is costing a house at a million or more does not automatically indicate that the cost is based upon good quality or good design.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2008 at 8:40AM
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bcooney

I live in one of those 70s houses with the brick front and horrible cedar shakes on the other 3 sides. I'm shopping siding as we speak and would love opinions on what would look best--a shake or board? Fiber cement (HardiPlank, Nichiha or vinyl (CertainTeed Cedar Impressions)?

btw, the large evergreen on the front corner will be replaced with a magnolia. From House

    Bookmark   October 1, 2008 at 1:35PM
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eastgate

I just got a quote of $7650 for installing Hardiplank on a 1000 square foot house (one story, with 1700 square feet of siding). This estimate came from a general contractor. I would prefer wood, but that costs even more. Does this quote seem reasonable?

Sorry to be stupid, but does 1700 square feet translate to 17 squares?

    Bookmark   October 1, 2008 at 4:31PM
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maj1k

OP, do what you like and what you can afford.

    Bookmark   October 2, 2008 at 10:35AM
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carterinms

We paid $17,500/sq for Hardie colorplus (prepainted), which works out to around $700 per square. This also included soffits and flashing where required. The house is elevated with the majority above 10' above grade, and ICF, which meant that the Hardie had to be screwed instead of nailed. The installer was by far the most expensive of our quotes, but was also the only one who seemed to have a clue what he was doing. And he did an awesome job, so for once we got what we paid for!

    Bookmark   October 2, 2008 at 2:32PM
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eastgate

Carterinms, why does the Hardie have to be screwed rather than nailed if the house is raised? My house is raised, but only by about 2 feet.

    Bookmark   October 2, 2008 at 4:45PM
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carterinms

The hardie had to be screwed because the house is ICF. I mentioned that the house was raised because much of the installation was done on ladders, which I assume also increased the cost.

    Bookmark   October 2, 2008 at 6:20PM
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