What type of hardware for pocket door?

kaysdSeptember 12, 2012

We are installing 2 new pocket doors in our master bath - one from the bedroom into the vanity area, and one from vanity to the shower and toilet area. The doors will be 30" x 80" with recessed opaque glass panels, so they will be heavy because of the glass.

Our walls are open, so we can use any type of hardware. I have seen Johnson hardware recommended several times on this site, but is there any particular Johnson door frame or sliding hardware you would recommend? I told my GC to use Johnson hardware, but I don't think he is familiar with the brand.

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jules8

We used Johnson. Home Depot carries it. the model for your size states it can handle 200 pounds.
we are happy with ours, but our door is pretty small and light.

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 12:15PM
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mongoct

Johnson and Lawrence are the brands I've used. Both are fine. I simply recommend avoiding the entry level Johnson package.

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 1:55PM
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kaysd

Thank you. Mongo, which is the entry level package?

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 2:18PM
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palimpsest

If you look right on the Johnson Hardware Website, you will see size and weight ratings for each package. I went with the commercial rated or heavy duty package for my doors. (102" x 30")

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 7:12PM
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mongoct

I think it's the 2511 series that is the "entry level". I'm pretty sure it's the 2511 that uses smaller wheels, maybe 3/4" in diameter? The cross section of the overhead track limits you to that diameter wheel even if you go for the "upgraded" version within that line. The "upgraded" version brings you ball bearing wheels, but they are still 3/4"D.

Most of the other ones have 1" wheels, which is the minimum I prefer to go with.

Don't be shy about discarding the studs that come with the kit if you get the door kit. You want straight with good grain. I've seen a few kit studs in my day that ended up as firewood.

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 7:16PM
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kirkhall

I asked this question just recently and here is that thread:
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/remodel/msg0823332720866.html?8

Here is a link that might be useful: which johnson hardware to use

    Bookmark   September 13, 2012 at 7:42PM
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mongoct

brickeye recommended the 111PD which has 3/4" wheels. Since your doors are glass and are heavy, I recommend 1" wheels and a kit with a jump proof track. Of course those are my personal preferences.

The 111PD is a "hardware only" kit with 3/4" wheels. Your framers/carpenters should be able to build the opening just fine.

For the hardware only kits, I recommend you look at the 200PD and the 100PD. The 200PD has a 400lb capacity and 4 wheels per truck. The 100PD has a 200lb capacity and a 3-wheel truck.

For the entire door kit (framing plus hardware) they have a 2000 series for 2x4 walls and a 2060 series for 2x6 walls, they use the same hardware as the 200PD hardware only kit (400# capacity, four 1" wheels per truck, jump proof track).

The 1500 series framing plus hardware kit is for 2x4 walls and the 1560 is for 2x6 walls, they use the same hardware as the 100PD hardware kit (200# capacity, three 1" wheels per truck, jump proof track).

The 2511 2x4 wall door package that I described as their "entry level kit" uses the same hardware as the 111PD hardware only kit.

For glass doors I always recommend jump proof tracks. You have a single 2-6 x 6-8 door, solid wood stiles and rails with glass. It's heavy, but not ridiculously heavy. I'd recommend having your builder look at the 100PD hardware only kit, or the 1500/1560 complete door kit which uses the 100PD hardware. Upgrade the kit from the standard trucks to the 1125 ball bearing trucks and you have 200# of capacity, three 1" ball bearing wheels per truck, and a jump proof track.

Again, that's just a recommendation.

    Bookmark   September 14, 2012 at 10:11AM
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millworkman

What Mongo said is spot on!!

    Bookmark   September 14, 2012 at 11:47AM
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brickeyee

I doubt even a glass door will come close to 200 pounds.

    Bookmark   September 14, 2012 at 4:38PM
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mongoct

"I doubt even a glass door will come close to 200 pounds.

I doubt it too.

    Bookmark   September 14, 2012 at 8:18PM
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brickeyee

Three points define a plane.

The fourth wheel is mostly for show.

Unless they deform they are not going to share weight equally, unlike a three wheel setup.

    Bookmark   September 16, 2012 at 11:13AM
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kaysd

Thank you!

    Bookmark   September 17, 2012 at 9:01PM
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mongoct

"Three points define a plane. The fourth wheel is mostly for show. Unless they deform they are not going to share weight equally, unlike a three wheel setup."

The 100PD that I recommended has three wheels per truck.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2012 at 1:07AM
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