coefficient of friction

writersblockSeptember 22, 2012

Can someone please explain to me how the COF numbers really compare to each other? For instance, we were thinking of using the wall tile we chose on the floor as well, but the wet COF is only .55, which I realize isn't great.

But how much difference is there between a .55 tile and, say, one at .65 in terms of how slippery it will really be?

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bill_vincent

I'm curious how they can determine a wet COF, considering that there are alot of variables that come into play, even given that it's water that's wetting the tile! What's in the water? Minerals? Soap? Is it just a film of water? Submerged? What temp? WAY too many variables.

    Bookmark   September 22, 2012 at 5:38PM
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pharaoh

Although I dont the scientific reason for it but I am sure bare feet are less slippery than footwear.

We have polished marble floor in a bathroom and I feel a lot less slippery when I am bare footed. Must have to do with how we grip...

    Bookmark   September 22, 2012 at 6:06PM
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writersblock

LOL, Bill. But there must be some formula or set test they use to determine these numbers, no? Do you think I should shun a floor tile that lists the wet COF as .55?

Pharoah, I agree. Our whole downstairs is tiled and I always kick my shoes off as soon as I'm through the door. (Of course, that's partly because in steamy FL those cool tiles feel so nice.)

    Bookmark   September 23, 2012 at 10:34AM
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bill_vincent

Do you think I should shun a floor tile that lists the wet COF as .55?

Actually, wet, that's not bad at all.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2012 at 5:58PM
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writersblock

Thanks!

    Bookmark   September 23, 2012 at 6:53PM
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stellawinslet

By measuring the coefficient of friction, a quantitative number can be determined. To determine this, a 50 pound weight is placed on a neolite heel and is pulled across the surface both wet and dry. The maximum amount of force (pounds) needed to initiate the weight is then recorded. This measurement is divided by the amount of weight (50lbs.) and referred to as the static coefficient of friction value.

    Bookmark   September 24, 2012 at 4:27AM
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writersblock

Thanks, stellawinslet. Nice to know how they arrive at the numbers.

    Bookmark   September 24, 2012 at 9:56AM
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