Easyboard OVER drywall?

alan_s_thefirstAugust 18, 2012

I know it sounds odd, but read on:

Above my vanity light fixture there's a chase which means it's only going to clear the light fixture by a few inches. There's nothing in the fitting literature about clearances, but it's halogen so will probably put out some heat. I was considering one row of tiles (I'm using 8" tiles, most likely, because I have a bunch of them, and I'm out of money.)

I was going to attach them directly to the drywall of the chase (using methods of attaching to ceiling I've read ) - probably 3-4 tiles in all, and use some sort of Schluter edge. It's not a lot of tiles but it will be directly above a porcelain sink.

Someone told me under code rules I'll need to remove the drywall and use backerboard, but could I put the backerboard on top of the drywall? It'll be a bit thicker but I can probably get a Schluter edge that'll work with that.

Bad Idea? It just seems like a lot of work to remove sound drywall AND a corner edge piece, neatly, when I could go over it with backerboard. As for moisture, there may be steam but no direct water contact.

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mongoct

"Someone told me under code rules I'll need to remove the drywall and use backerboard..."

There are always local caveats to code...however...

Only if it's a wet area...in general, the lower portion of a shower wall or tub surround wall that will receive direct water spray. That's where IRC requires a certain type of tile backer board.

"Decorative tile" in a non-wet area...which this seems to be from your description...you can tile directly on gypsum board.

My apologies if I'm mis-reading your question.

Best, Mongo

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 11:59AM
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alan_s_thefirst

Mongo, you read me right. It's 'decorative' in the sense that it's not protecting against water, heat perhaps. Using a modified thinset, I'm assuming it won't mind a little heat and won't let go (I've read about the trick of making the 'circle' in the thinset to create a suction cup) This guy - ok, he works at Home Depot - says there's a code about it. That being said, I've yet to see ANY builder of a new home here in British Columbia use ANYTHING but regular drywall in bathrooms in new construction here. When I'm working on the houses it tends to be just before insulating and around completion, so who knows, they may be using Redgard or Kerdi. Somehow I wonder.

No water spray. Shouldn't be, anyway, directly over a sink. As for expansion and contraction, it'll butt up against a Schluter edge on one side, and a corner on the other, which I'll do with silicone or caulk vs grout.

Thanks for weighing in.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2012 at 7:50PM
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