Do your dishes come out of the DW totally dry?

olivertwistkitchenJuly 3, 2012

We have a new Fridgidaire DW, and it does exactly what our old one did. Pretty much everything on the top rack comes out wet. This is all the tupperware, plastic bowls and plastic cups. I end up unpacking it all and spreading it out on dishtowels to dry.

It's not that I mind too much, but I'm realizing that a huge problem that I have no counterspace is that I always have dishes drying on the countertop. What a waste of counterspace.

So do I need to re-design the kitchen with more counterspace, or get a different dishwasher? Do all DW do this? If I had a DW with a higher heat setting would I melt all that plasticware?

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Sophie Wheeler

Do you use rinse aid? If not, there's your problem.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 9:36AM
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cat_mom

Plastic stuff usually comes out with varying degrees of wetness. Concave parts of coffee mugs for ex., usually retain some water as well (if I place the mugs on a more angled section of the rack, there is usually less water, if any).

Our Miele DW does not have a heating element in it, which means I can put plastic items anywhere in the DW without fearing that they will melt. I much prefer the ability to do that, and I am willing to forgo bone dry plastic-ware in order to be able to place my larger plastic containers on the bottom rack of my DW.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 11:06AM
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mysteryclock

Our old KA dishwasher used to get everything pretty dry even on "Energy Saver" and absolutely bone-dry on "Heated Dry" but the exposed heating element was a big risk for items that might have been blown out of position. One time we had a small plastic item get stuck and melt all over the thing, and it took some delicate scraping and several months before the stink was out.

Our current Bosch DW is far, FAR better at cleaning than the old KA was and there is no exposed heating element so things cannot melt. Oddly, ceramic/metal/glass items usually come out quite dry (maybe small amounts of water on the concave tops of glasses) but plastic is almost always wet. Quite frankly, I can handle this if it means everything is coming out perfectly clean and without any hard water stains (thanks to the built-in softener.) But it is a bit odd.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 11:26AM
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olivertwistkitchen

Our new DW came with a free package of rinse aid. I don't get it, though. How is adding something going to make things dryer? Also, we use Seventh Generation detergent, so I'm apprehensive about adding more chemicals to the mix.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 12:15PM
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weissman

Rinse aid causes the water to bead up and run off so things tend to dry faster. I use rinse aid along with heated dry and everything comes out perfectly dry except for little puddles of water in cup and bowl indentations. As long as you put plastics in the upper rack, you shouldn't have any problems with things melting.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 12:30PM
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weedmeister

Actually, rinse aid caused water to NOT bead up so it runs off (sheets off, they say).

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 1:32PM
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Nunyabiz1

Everything bone dry except the occasional deep pocket on the bottom of something.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 2:13PM
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clinresga

This subject has been argued to the death in numerous prior threads. It's the old "American heated dry versus Euro non-heated dry" technology issue. Rather than rewrite my longwinded opinions on this subject, try this thread:

When did we allow machines to enslave us?

In short, I greatly prefer the energy savings and lack of melted plastics with our Miele and Bosch DW's versus the coil-heated GE's we had back in the day.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 2:33PM
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marc_ia

Do you use the regular heated dry cycle? I never need to but maybe yours needs it. My hot water and stainless interior dries everything except the indent on the top oh glasses which I go over quickly with a towel then put everything away.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 7:37PM
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Navajome

Not really. Mine are still pretty wet, but they are clean.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2012 at 9:08PM
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gsciencechick

We have SS tub (LG DW), and I only have to wipe the very bottoms of coffee cups but sometimes not even that. Yes, I use a rinse-aid. Our plastic cups that we use for water fare fine. We may have to wipe the bottoms of those, too. Don't really have issues with warping on the top rack plastics.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 8:04AM
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Emilner

My new KA gets the dishes and all plastics totally dry except for typical sippy cup and the bottom of mugs where water collects...

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 9:19AM
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Sophie Wheeler

As I suspected, you aren't using rinse aid. The problem isn't the machine. Read your owner's manual. Rinse aid is a REQUIRED step of using a DW. If you don't want to use it, you'll have to resign yourself to wet dishes in any machine.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 9:20AM
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dadoes

OliverTwist,

Rinse aid is not a new thing to the automatic dishwashing process. It has been available for 50+ years. It was touted in the past as an optional additive to eliminate water spotting on dishware, but the parameters have changed. As other have advised, rinse aid is required for proper drying results in all dishwashers nowadays. They're engineered with the expectation that the consumer will use rinse aid. You can choose to not use it but the trade-off is much more residual moisture on the items. Many units now do not have heated dry, instead relying on heat retained in the items from the final rinse along with rinse aid to promote evaporation. Units that do have heated dry are running with lower-wattage heating elements, and the heat may cycle on/off during the dry period instead of remaining on continuously as in the past.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 10:41AM
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flwrs_n_co

My Maytag is about 10 years old. Plastic interior. I never use the heated dry cycle, but I do use rinse aid. My dishes and plastics come out dry (except for divots on the bottom of cups and glasses) unless I open it immediately after the cycle ends. It definitely helps the "natural" drying to keep it closed for a couple of hours or more after it's finished the cycle.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:28PM
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