blue star burner cast iron-anybody pre-season with oil and bake.

mtshastaalMay 29, 2009

Since BS uses cast iron burner grate and burner plate, it seems to me it would be a good idea to season them like we do with cast iron cookwware. You wipe the parts with oil and then bake then wipe dry. Has anyone done this?

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joe_blowe

They're porcelain-coated; they do not 'season'.

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 2:13PM
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mtshastaal

I thank you for the answer but I think you are in error. I have seen the range in person and I saw no enamel on the burners. Check out the link below.

Here is a link that might be useful: Blue Star Burner Cleaning

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 3:30PM
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amcook

No, they are not porcelain coated. I actually cut one of the cooktop grates to create a wok grate. That said, they are in effect pre-seasoned. The black surface is either some sort of high temp bake on coating or simple seasoning. I use many cast iron cookware so I can say that the grates are definitely not bare unseasoned cast iron.

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 3:44PM
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joe_blowe

mtshastaal and amcook: Yes, they are porcelain. (I should know -- I have an RNB30 with a chip in one grate.)

http://www.bluestar-ranges.com/ (Eurstoves)

"Novaî, SuperNovaî and Simmer Burners
The cast iron porcelain-enameled Nova and SuperNova top burners are the most versatile burners in the industry."

Here is a link that might be useful: Google Search on GardenWeb: bluestar porcelain

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 4:33PM
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amcook

The burner and grate are two different parts. I didn't see anywhere where it described the grates as porcelain enameled. Now that said, it might be but it's not like any porcelain enamel I've ever seen. When I cut it, I did not see any chipping or flaking as I would expect if it were enameled. The exterior layer is extremely thin more like seasoned cast iron than an additional coating. Also, note that I've got the cooktop which has different grates than the range.

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 6:31PM
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Fori is not pleased

I thought they introduced the porcelain coated a year or two ago as an option--shiny or matte? Am I misremembering?

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 7:06PM
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Fori is not pleased

The website for BS does make this claim:

Our cast iron porcelain-enameled Nova, SuperNova, and UltraNova top burners are the most versatile burners in the industry.

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 7:08PM
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joe_blowe

Anybody familiar with Le Creuset and Staub enameled cast iron cookware knows that the interior of the former is smooth, while the interior of the latter is "rough". But they are, in fact, both coated with porcelain enamel. (IOW, it all ain't smooth!)

If you are still in doubt, call Prizer-Painter -- they'll set you straight.

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 8:14PM
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alexrander

Joe is right, they are porcelain coated with a rough finish, but they can be seasoned as well- but I don't put them in the oven, I just occasionally wipe a bit of grapeseed oil on them- since mine don't go into a dishwasher, I only do it about once every 6 months or so- . Also, if put through the dishwasher, they can rust, partly because there is a small hole on the underside- and partly because even coated cast iron will rust if left wet long enough and there may be micro-pitting in the finish from the harsh detergents and just through use...

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 10:51PM
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joe_blowe

Look, I realize I'm being a bit pedantic at this point, but you CAN NOT "season" enamel.

Porcelain enamel, whether it's smooth or rough, is glass. You are defying logic and science when you say you are going to polymerize a coating of oil to the surface of "rough glass" and call it "seasoning". What you have is a thin film of burnt oil on top of the glass. That's it. It hasn't bonded with the surface, it's just laying there...

Now if you want to oil your grates so they have nice luster, I'm all for that! Just don't call it seasoning.

    Bookmark   May 30, 2009 at 11:59AM
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alexrander

Joe, you haven't heard that phrase?: "To everything there is a season...." it's in the Bible, and the song "Turn, Turn, Turn.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2009 at 1:03AM
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thull

Yeah, but oil does do a nice job when you get a little rust. I'm assuming is isn't the porcelain that's rusting. ;-)

Did no one else catch that amcook said he/she cut their grate to better work with a wok? Unless you're talking about a 6" wok, all you have to do is pick up the inner ring and you have a perfect wok base. Why on earth would you take a hacksaw to the grate?

    Bookmark   June 1, 2009 at 8:38AM
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amcook

The drop-in cooktop grate is a single piece. No inner ring. :( The sales guy (trying to sell the product) told me I could just remove the grate and set the wok in the bowl. I wasn't comfortable with that since that would provide no air gap for the heat to escape and probably cause the flames to flair out, which might be dangerous. After seeing the thing in person, I realized that by simply cutting off the 4 pointed "fingers" of the grate, there is a nice opening just right for a wok. Also, by cutting at a diagonal, I was able to provide 8 points of support for the wok. I think what I did basically reproduced the center ring grate on the range model.

BTW, hack saw would work but I took a grinder with metal cutting wheel to it. Took less than 5 min to do the whole thing.

    Bookmark   June 1, 2009 at 12:45PM
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thull

Huh. Bummer about the grates not being like the ones on the ranges. Did you buy a spare?

    Bookmark   June 2, 2009 at 11:27AM
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amcook

> Huh. Bummer about the grates not being like the ones on the ranges. Did you buy a spare?

Yeah, I knew it going in so it wasn't so bad. Yes, I did end up getting an extra grate for the wok so no big deal.

    Bookmark   June 2, 2009 at 1:54PM
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jacobsmishpacha

I have the drop-in cooktop too, and since I can't remove the grate I just put the wok ring on the grate- but I invert it so that the base of the wok is almost flat on the grate. I must say, though, I never thought of just cutting the grate. I definitely don't recommend attempting to use a wok without the grate; however. It would be sitting right on the flame, causing the flame to shoot up the sides of the wok.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2009 at 10:22AM
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ya_think

hi jacobsmishpacha - Last time I saw a post from you was in January where you mentioned you didn't think you were getting the right power from your cooktop. Did you ever come to a conclusion on that? At the time I also asked about the resolution to your initial start-up issues, but you never seemed to come back. Hope you see this and respond!

    Bookmark   June 3, 2009 at 10:59AM
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ya_think

joe blowe - While I won't debate your definition of seasoning (I just don't know) here's what Staub says about their matte enamel:

"The more you use it, the better it gets! Oils used when cooking will penetrate the pores of the matte enamel and create a natural, smooth non-stick surface."

So I guess the question is how does well-used Staub cookware look? Would you want that look on your range grates?

Here is a link that might be useful: the grill pan i was just looking at which made me think of this thread

    Bookmark   June 15, 2009 at 4:50PM
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JudyE01

I just asked Blue Star customer service this question and got the following response:
"The top grate and ring grate are cast iron with a cast iron coating. Seasoning is recommended."
I am seasoning with flaxseed oil and baking for an hour at 550o. Have done two coats so far and it looks beautiful. Hopefully this will make clean up of cooked on spills very easy.

    Bookmark   February 13, 2013 at 2:19AM
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