Can you put 20x20 tile on the walls?

ljalterMay 28, 2009

I am looking at a rectified porcelain tile, and I am wondering if you can put 20x20 on a wall (or if you would even want to!). Alternatively, since it's rectified, can this be easily cut in half to do 10x20 stacked for the walls? The edges are totally square - no bevel - like stone. (When I say stacked on the wall, I mean like subway tile.)

This is the tile (just hit GO on Las Vegas to see it - it's dumb that you have to choose a location!): Rectified Porcelain

The picture doesn't look like the actual tile at all - it's a really creamy light beige with a subtle stone look, though no 'printing' on it (if that makes sense - some tile looks really fake). It's just soooo cheap and looks totally expensive in person. (In my opinion!)

Any thoughts would be great!

(PS. This is part of my exploration of ideas from this thread. I am looking at large format, stone-look tile and I just love this in person.)

Thanks!

Laura

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barthelemy

Yes you can, provided you use the appropriate adhesive ( the maximum admitted size of tile will be specified if you check the technical date sheet of your adhesive, from what I've seen it can go up to 24x24 with fairly standard products).

That being said ... I wanted a subtle limestone look for my bathroom, and while I first considered 24x24 rectified tiles, I finally opted for 12x24 rectified tiles, with a staggered pattern, because I think they look closer to the real thing in this size and pattern.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2009 at 5:39PM
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bill_vincent

I am looking at a rectified porcelain tile, and I am wondering if you can put 20x20 on a wall (or if you would even want to!). Alternatively, since it's rectified, can this be easily cut in half to do 10x20 stacked for the walls?

Yes, and yes. When I was in south Florida, several of the master baths I did down there were with 18x18 to 24x24 tiles. In fact, in the apartment I had just before I got the house I'm in now, I did my tub enclosure with 18x18's.

Yes you can, provided you use the appropriate adhesive

It MUST be a portland cement based thinset, no matter if it's a wet or dry area for tile that big.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2009 at 6:54PM
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ljalter

Awesome, thank you!

Bill - what about cutting the tile to 10x20? Would that work since it's rectified? Or is that something that would be hard to do without damaging the tile?

Thanks again!

Laura

    Bookmark   May 28, 2009 at 7:24PM
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pharaoh

We used 18x18 marble in a shower. Love it. Bigger, truly, is better in a shower. Imagine less grout to grow mildew :)

In our next shower I am trying to use slabs instead of tiles. will see how difficult and expensive it will be.

Get 24x24 if you can.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2009 at 8:18PM
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barthelemy

Here are a few pics of my 12x24 staggered tile (please pardon the poor quality of the pics, they are from my GC who wanted to show me the grouted tile ... i'm not in this house yet)

    Bookmark   May 28, 2009 at 9:31PM
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bill_vincent

Laura-- It depends on the edge of the tile. If it's square-- like it's already been cut, then yes-- you're fine to cut the tiles down to whatever size you wish. However, many rectified porcelains have a slight chamfer on the edge, just like natural stone. If that's the case, and you want to cut them down, you can still do it, but you'd have to cut off ALL factory edges first. Otherwise it'd look strange with one cut edge and three factory edges. It'd show different even after being grouted, if that's the case. That would be the ONLY reason, though why it would be difficult. If you've got square edges, you're golden.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2009 at 11:13PM
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ljalter

That looks great, barthelemy!! I really like the look. What brand tile did you use? Did you go right to the ceiling?

I am wondering what to do about capping the edge on the walls - I want to go to chair rail height. Our bathroom ceilings are really high and slanted, and I think going to the ceiling would look odd.

Would it be too busy to do 20x20 diagonal on the floor with a 10x20 border and then 10x20 staggered on the walls? I plan to integrate some accent tile (likely aqua glass to match the vanity top), but I figure I can work those in once I have the pattern and size decided. Ugh, more decisions!

Thank you for any and all help! :D

Laura

    Bookmark   May 29, 2009 at 10:28AM
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downtowner

Nothing to it. Easy as pie.

Here is a link that might be useful: 24 x 24

    Bookmark   May 30, 2009 at 10:44AM
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barthelemy

Laura,

the plain tile is from Lea Ceramiche, 'Masterplan' collection, 'Avorio' shade, 'Lappato' finish ... http://www.ceramichelea.it/acm-on-line/en/Home/products/collections/cardCatmasterplan.33.1.20.2.html

The accent glass mosaic is from Casamood, 'Vetro' collection, 'Metalico Oro' shade ... http://www.casamood.com/home.asp?lang=_eng

The tile with the romantic scenes is from Novoceram, a French manufacturer which does awesome 'ceramic wallpapers' ... http://www.novoceram.fr/art.jsp?&serieid=97&language=en

I do feel that the combination of a diagonal pattern and a staggered pattern would be too much, but it's only my opinion and it's difficult to say without seeing your room.

    Bookmark   May 31, 2009 at 5:19PM
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janealexa

I know this is an old thread, but I am also putting 20x20 rectified tiles on the walls of a tub/shower combo. What grout space should we use with these large format rectified tiles?

    Bookmark   October 29, 2011 at 3:34PM
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1957pinkharley

Jane, Per my installer, you would want a minimum 1/8th inch. Any less and you would have trouble getting the grout in sufficiently deep.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 10:33AM
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mongoct

Actually, 1/16th" grout lines are fairly typical for a rectified. There really should be no issues whatsoever filling a 1/16th" grout line with grout.

When using a 1/16th" line, it's not grouting that is problematic. Grouting with unsanded grout is actually the easier part. It's setting the tile in with no lippage that requires the effort.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 11:00AM
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PRO
Sophie Wheeler

The other thing to consider with an installation with large format tile is that the not so sexy preparation to tile is everything. (As it is in most jobs!) The wall flatness is critical. You need to spend some time with a straight edge and level to be sure the studs are perfect before applying the cement board. And leave no "humps" at those joins from thinset application. If you or your tradesman don't take the time behind the walls, then what's on top of the walls will have issues.

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 7:39AM
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