Infinity Drain

GreenDog194May 12, 2012

Since I can't seem to find a shower pan I like, I'm considering using tile, but big tiles to avoid grout (the reason I wanted a shower pan in the first place). To avoid having to cut big tile into angles to get the water to drain, we are considering an "Infinity Drain"-like system, where everything drains to one side of the shower.

Have any of you used this?

Any tips? Things to avoid? Brands you love?

http://infinitydrain.com/

http://www.schluter.com/7957_7958.aspx

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lee676

Lots of us have - search on Trench Drain

    Bookmark   May 12, 2012 at 6:26AM
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GreenDog194

Thanks, wow, there is a lot of wisdom out there. Thanks for giving me the proper search term.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2012 at 10:02PM
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weimom

We are having a Proline Drain put in our new shower. Can't wait to see how it turns out.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2012 at 11:57PM
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littleStef

We had planned to have the linear / trench. Plumber said they normally use Infinity Drain. But, I got scared off when the product finally arrived. Our plumbers chose the site-sizeable model. You literally have to cut the linear portion in two pieces to size it. Then, the middle section where the actual drain is gets glued in between those pieces. Cutting and gluing made me worry. Too much room for installer error. Does that glue hold forever? And, the Infinity Drain is completely flat with no slope. I was concerned about that, too. I would have preferred the Proline. It just seemed like a better product to me. In the end, I abandoned the idea and just went with a regular square drain.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 6:38PM
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lazypup

While it is commonly called glueing technically that is not correct...

The glue softens the plastic in both mating surfaces and once the two pieces are fitted together the plastic from one piece actually fuses into the opposite piece to form what is technically called a chemical weld. Once the cure time has elapsed the entire piece is then one solid piece of plastic in the same manner as if it were two pieces of steel that had been welded together.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 6:58PM
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