Durarock vs. Kerdi?

lkcbApril 22, 2008

My master bath is currently gutted. We removed the tub and are creating a large shower in that space. I've been lurking here for a while and have gotten some great info, but my contractor is planning to use durarock for the shower, and i'm wondering should I pick the battle and try to get him to use kerdi instead, or is durarock adequate?

Thanks.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terriks

Personally, I feel that Kerdi is better. With Kerdi the shower is waterproofed right under the tile. There is absoluteley no way that it can get to the studs. Water and vapor can get through tile, grout AND durarock. If you don't use a surface waterproofer like Kerdi or Redguard you need to make sure that a vapor barrier is installed behind the backerboard.

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 3:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
codnuggets

Kerdi is not a substitute for Durock or other concrete backerboard underlayment (CBU). Durock is the substrate required for a shower enclosure, and Kerdi is a waterproofing membrane that goes on top of the CBU to make the whole shower water-tight. If you dig through the posts here, you will quickly find out that a good number of contractors will use CBU and then tile directly over it with no waterproofing membrane. While this does meet code, it's a recipe for premature failure of the entire shower. For best results, CBU and Kerdi together is the way to go. At a minimum, as terriks noted, you'll need a vapor barrier behind the CBU if no topical membrane is used.

While you're doing your research, read up on the pre-slope required UNDER the shower pan liner, another step that many contractors will skip.

Good luck. Joe.

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 5:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terriks

Kerdi can be applied directly to drywall. In fact that is what the manufacturer, Schluter, recommends.

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 6:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Stonetech

As to the mention of the "PreSlope," be advised that, if you're using Kerdi, either over durock or wallboard (entirely acceptable) you WILL be using Kerdi on the floor of the shower as well as the Kerdi drain. With this method, there is NO "preslope" required. It's about the only time you don't need one.

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 7:24PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mongoct

lazarususa,

Just to make sure we're all on the same page, you realize that on the floor, the substrate that the Kerdi is adhered to still has to be sloped, right?

The floor Kerdi can be sloped either by applying it over a sloped Kerdi Tray, which is foam and sloped, or it can be applied over a deck mud preslope.

But the Kerdi on the floor does need to be sloped.

To clarify things for other readers, realize that whatever membrane is used on the floor of a shower, that membrane needs to be sloped. The waterproofing membrane should never be "flat".

Mongo

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 8:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bill_vincent

While this does meet code, it's a recipe for premature failure of the entire shower.

The hell it is. Kerdi does take it up a step. But what it does is take shower building one step closer to being "goof proof". That's not to say that conventional showers will fail prematurely. That's COMPLETELY an inaccurate statement.

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 8:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
codnuggets

Sorry, Bill. I overstepped my knowledge level a bit with that statement. One of these days I'll stop giving advice where I know not of what I speak. Kerdi is great, but that doesn't mean everything else is crap.

My apologies. Joe.

    Bookmark   April 22, 2008 at 8:48PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pirula

We used both, Durock and Kerdi. Is it like a belt and suspenders? Maybe. But the Durock cost is minimal over regular drywall or green board when you're spending gazillions on the bathroom. So why not be extra cautious?

Ivette

    Bookmark   April 23, 2008 at 4:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Stonetech

Mongo~~ Sure, I know that you still need a sloped mud floor....or a Schluter pan to set the Kerdi on. I was just making the point that there is no "Pre-slope" needed for a Kerdi shower.......

    Bookmark   April 23, 2008 at 7:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bill_vincent

That's kinda my thought, as well.

    Bookmark   April 23, 2008 at 7:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Stonetech

Along the same lines....I'm currently doing a steam shower (for some obscene money) where the HO had a regular shower before hurricane Rita. She has it stripped to the studs and wants a "Steam Shower" to replace it. There is currently a good pre-slope, vinyl liner and a finished slope on the floor. Am I going to break it out and start over.....nawwww. Just going to cut away the exposed liner, flash the walls to the floor, Kerdi everything up to and over the existing curb and install their drain. Works for me!

    Bookmark   April 23, 2008 at 7:45PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Should I be concerned about the lippage on my new tile job?
At first glance my porcelain tile job in my bathroom...
susanelewis
Conflicting Contractors: how to anchor a shower niche shelf
Dear Bathroom Wizards, We put an 18-inch wide, extra-tall...
hobobrian
Stop Frameless Shower from Slamming Shut?
Just completed a renovation of our master suite and...
ntrainer
Wall Mural (Photo Wallpaper, Photo Tile or Hire Artist?)
We have one wall in bath that's a hand-painted mural....
stevemac00
HELP! Is this an acylic or fiberglass tub?
Here's a photo of the side. Can anyone identify this...
wmcjhi
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™