Tile Experts: another question re cove.

ineffablespaceFebruary 7, 2014

This is mocked up with two different colors of tile, but is there any reason this could not be done vertically inside a shower or bath enclosure? It is square cove with square tile.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
raehelen

What a neat idea! Is the coved tile longer? Can you take a pic showing the edges of the coved tile? Would it bother you if one side was longer than the other?

    Bookmark   February 7, 2014 at 6:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ineffablespace

They are not. They are still 4.25 x 4.25 overall but the lip adds another 1/4" to the thickness at that edge.

The edge of the cove on these tiles (American Olean) is glazed.

I like this idea because it gets rid of the joint in the corner.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2014 at 7:36PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
enduring

I think the joint in the corner has to be able to move.

This is how I see the situation, though I could be wrong:

When the 2 perpendicular surfaces contract or expand they do so at different degrees and directions. There needs to be a expansion joint and the caulked corner will serve as that joint.

I don't know why or how a cove works in the floor installation because I frankly don't see any difference with what you've shown. Maybe there will be more input from Mongoct or Stonetech or others that have installed tile.

    Bookmark   February 8, 2014 at 3:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ineffablespace

That's what I am trying to figure out.

I've never seen a crack through the cove in a coved tile and I've seen a fair amount of coved tile in places with other cracks.

I was wondering if it would make sense to not put mastic behind the coved portion so the expansion area would be in the corner behind the cove, and the joint between the coved tile and the flat tile could be caulked.

It gets the crevice out of the corner, anyway.

    Bookmark   February 8, 2014 at 4:17PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
StoneTech

It makes sense NOT to put "mastic" anywhere in a shower!

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 12:36PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ineffablespace

It's not going to be DIY and I am using the wrong terminology, I'm sure. The tile setter will use the appropriate material.

The tile setter also likely knows the correct answer to the question, but since the bathrooms are in the planning stage I wanted to know if this is something that even makes sense because coving the corners and trying to use full tiles relates each wall to the next and the dimensions in the framing needed to accomplish this change.

So, Stonetech if you really wanted to be helpful, you would answer the question, and correct my incorrect "mastic" term with the right one instead of just making a comment to point out my stupidity.

This post was edited by ineffablespace on Sun, Feb 9, 14 at 14:06

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 1:57PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dekeoboe

So, Stonetech if you really wanted to be helpful, you would answer the question, and correct my incorrect "mastic" term with the right one instead of just making a comment to point out my stupidity.

I believe Stonetech answered the way he did because some people DO use mastic in their shower and then have to redo the shower because it leaks. So, it was not clear that you were using an incorrect term as opposed to using the wrong product.

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 6:04PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
palimpsest

It would have been helping to say "It makes sense NOT to put "mastic" anywhere in a shower. The correct product is thinset mortar."

(If that is indeed the correct product).

By pointing out the error and not the correction, particularly if he thought someone was Using it, instead of the correct product, and not just using the wrong term, it is a jab meant to point out someone's inferiority. If he had added the second sentence, THEN he would be being helpful.

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 6:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
StoneTech

Apologies. I certainly wasn't trying to point out anyone's "stupidity." It's just that using mastic or "premixed thinset" is probably one of the most common mistakes that both homeowners AND some so called "tile setters" have done.

As to your question, I've never seen that done in a shower, and, while it looks interesting, it probably isn't a good idea, for this reason; anytime there is a change-of-plane, a colour matching silicone caulk should be used as these areas will generally move, relative to moisture, temperature, house settling, etc.

The tiles should have a small....1/8" or so gap to accomodate this movement...hence, the caulk. Your tile does not allow for this (sometimes microscopic) movement.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2014 at 1:28AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
enduring

StoneTech, how does the cove work in the floor/wall transition? I wondered this since it is a change of plane. Is the cove caulked to the wall joint instead of grouted, just where it makes the bend? Are cove pieces only used on cement surfaces, where the wall and the floor are concrete, and no contraction/expansion, like with wood?

    Bookmark   February 12, 2014 at 6:48AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ineffablespace

A well, I am probably a bit touchy and online 'tone' is not always easy to read.

That's my question though, how does this work at the floor change of plane but not a wall change of plane? I've never seen a cracked cove tile.

Also *could* you caulk the joint between the cove tile and the next field tile? That would still keep the caulk right out of the corner.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2014 at 3:19PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
StoneTech

Floors and wall seem to be a "Different Beast," and they rarely have this condition. Why are the walls of showers different? I would imagine that temperature and humidity have a lot to do with it. All I can say is that I have seen multiple failures in this area,

The only exception seems to be with the Kerdi Showers, where the membrane "Laps" the transitions and grouting appears to work quite well. Go Figgure.......

    Bookmark   February 13, 2014 at 9:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
StoneTech

The tiles don't generally crack at the transitions, but grout certainly will, therefore the use of caulk there is generally best.

Yes, cove on the floor is/was used extensively and was usually on a concrete base...but not always. Here, too, caulk is used instead of grout for the same reason as on the walls.

I think the cove in the shower wall should work, but leave a small gap and use a colour-matching silicone caulk.

    Bookmark   February 15, 2014 at 11:52AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ineffablespace

Thank you. This is probably what we will do, because I really like the idea of getting the caulk out of the square corner. I am also planning it as much as possible on the 4.25" increment so that there are minimal cuts to the tiles. Since we are starting from the framing up, we should be able to do it this way.

    Bookmark   February 15, 2014 at 12:09PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Microsilk vs. Air Tub (Jason) OR Bain Ultra
Apologies for the additional thread. I realize there...
divotdiva
wall mounted sink with hidden pipes?
Hi all, Would like a small-ish wall mounted sink, but...
randyelipson
Help me finish designing bathroom
Need a little help and to ask if you think I'm heading...
fourhappy
recommend sink for combo powder/bath
am planning combo laundry/half bath. side by side washer...
elleninmaine
Contractor messed up shower pan. Fixable?
My contractor who I'm firing tomorrow messed up my...
gwrussp
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™