Crazing on pottery pieces

justlindaOctober 30, 2009

I have a couple of pottery pieces, one of which is a mug and saucer, Canadian-made with red clay and which are not considered antiques. When held under a very bright light, I can see light crazing under the glaze.

Is this a bad thing? I have seen some very old china with this crazing, and which have discolored, probably from tea, etc. seeping in the crazing......

I'm wondering now about other stuff....old antique type things ~~ like should they just be avoided, does it diminish their value, etc.

Thanks for all opinions.

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lindac

Certain pottery just crazes....comes from having a vitrified(glassy) glaze over a non vitrified body which expand and contract at different rates....for softer pottery it's just not to be helped....you see an eBay sellec calling them "usual gar crazing"....but anything is worth more without.
The problem is that the body beneath is porous and absorbs tea, coffee, beet juice and just dirty stuff!
The most eyeopening thing to me was when I bought a lovely old blue pottery pie plate.....crazed but didn't look discolored.
So I make a beautiful apple pie in it....and it leaked and oozed awful black grease all over the outside!! EWW!!!
I now use it for potato chips!
Linda C

    Bookmark   October 30, 2009 at 7:00PM
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chris76

Crazing is common, but I don't know much more about it. I had a scare recently with my grandmother's old china: I had put the pieces through the dishwasher a couple years ago before I packed them away. When I got them out recently I found that some of the plates that were on the bottom of the box had mildewed! It seemed to be underneath the glaze, because it would not wash off. I assume this happened because moisture got underneath the glaze (through the crazing) and was not dried completely before I put them away. I mixed up a MILD bleach solution, poured it onto each plate before I stacked them in the sink, and let it sit for about 30 minutes. The mildew was gone, and I let the plates sit out for a few days before packing them away again. So, be careful with those crazed pieces.

    Bookmark   January 27, 2010 at 12:07PM
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lazypup

There are specialty glazes that actually create a crazing effect

    Bookmark   January 27, 2010 at 4:03PM
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javaandjazz

I have soaked some of my pottery pieces in a strong solution of oxyclean and hot water. Might take a few days. Sometimes all the dirt comes out and other times it comes out clean but as it dries out the dirt in the crazing reappears. You can also go to your nearest beauty supply and get the hydrogen peroxide that you dye you hair with and soak the pottery in that and from what I hear it safely cleans the dirt in the crazing. I have not tried that yet. You can soak towels in peroxide and just wrap them around your pottery and seal it all in a ziploc bag. Do a search online, there are plenty of directions for this.

    Bookmark   January 27, 2010 at 5:43PM
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blueheron

Sometimes china gets crazing, also. I have some dishes that were my mother's that are crazed. They are the brown Furnival's Quail pattern that I bought for her in England. I just love the dishes and it's too bad they are crazed. Mother never had a dishwasher, so they were always hand washed.

    Bookmark   January 27, 2010 at 8:35PM
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