Best solution to fill predrilled nails into concrete slab

the-tech-guyDecember 19, 2012

Hello fellow basement DIYers,
I had to tear up one 2x4x10 from the concrete slab in my basement and now I have 4 holes about 1.5" deep. What is the best way to fill these holes? Can I just use something like QUIKRETE� Polyurethane Concrete Crack Sealant? Also what is a good rule of thumb for the number of screws per 2x4x8 used as a baseplate?

Thanks guys

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worthy

As per the manufacturer's directions, the Quikrete should be let to set for 24 hours after each 1/4" thick application.

I don't know why you'd need an 8" wide baseplate. I anchor wood baseplates every four feet or so with concrete screws or a powder charge device.

This post was edited by worthy on Wed, Dec 19, 12 at 19:33

    Bookmark   December 19, 2012 at 7:28PM
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bus_driver

I used JB Weld to slightly overfill then sanded it flush two days later with 120 grit with rotary oscillating sander. It is difficult to see those places now.

    Bookmark   December 21, 2012 at 4:58PM
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mike_kaiser_gw

I'd use whatever concrete repair product they had a the home center. The unfortunate part is you'll be buying a bucket of the stuff.

Remember the baseplate should be pressure treated wood. I'd use a good bead of construction adhesive and screws every 2-3 feet.

    Bookmark   December 23, 2012 at 11:49AM
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the-tech-guy

Thanks everyone for the responses. I plan on starting my framing this weekend. I have the PT wood however I was not aware of having to use the construction adhesive on the wood. Is this necessary? Are not the screws enough?

    Bookmark   December 26, 2012 at 10:18AM
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The PT wood is unnecessary, as long as you provide at least 6mil poly under the plate. As for securing the framing, the screws are more than enough. Easier yet are powder charge fasteners. To provide a thermal break, use strips of 1" thick extruded polystyrene(XPS) between the plates and the concrete.

This post was edited by worthy on Thu, Dec 27, 12 at 13:59

    Bookmark   December 27, 2012 at 1:09PM
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bus_driver

While your State may be different, NC Code requires any wood in contact with concrete to be pressure treated. No mention of above or below grade. Would 6 mil poly satisfy an inspector? Maybe yes, maybe no.

    Bookmark   December 30, 2012 at 5:52PM
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worthy

Thanks for the reminder that local requirements may differ; I should append that qualifier to every posting in small legal print.

The pertinent North Carolina Building Code Section is:

"2304.11.2.2 Framing. Wood framing members, includ-
ing wood sheathing, which rest on exterior foundation
walls and are less than 8 inches (203 mm) from exposed
earth shall be of naturally durable or preservative-treated
wood. Wood framing members and furring strips at-
tached directly to the interior of exterior masonry or con-
crete walls below grade shall be of approved naturally
durable or preservative-treated wood." (emphasis added)

I would suggest to the authority having jurisdiction that an interposing section of XPS means that the wood framing is not "attached directly".

    Bookmark   January 1, 2013 at 9:50AM
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