closet, do you drywall inside

andrelaplume2August 27, 2008

We have a cleanout(?) that protrudes a foot or so on a wall. About 6 feet over our water meter sticks out. It was suggested I just frame out around the cleanout and water meter making a closet. We would add a couple of sliding doors to hide whatever we store in there....also we would have access to the cleanout and water meter. Sounds good to me...

Question...would I drywall the space from in back of the cleanout over as far as I can to the water meter...even though it will be hidden in the closet. Should I just put pink board up? I hate to loose 4 inches of depth in the closet due to framing and at the same time I hate to bring the closet an extra 4" out into the room.

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worthy

By Code, foam board in living space has to be covered by fire-resistant materials.

    Bookmark   August 27, 2008 at 10:24PM
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lazypup

Sounds like a health hazard in the making to me.

First off, the plumbing code requires a minimum of 24" assured clearance in front of that cleanout.

Code also requires an immediate assured clearance to the water meter.

Now for the health hazard. The incoming cold water is 20 to 35degF below the desired temperature in a dwelling. This results in condensate water forming on the pipes and meter. If you store cardboard boxes or clothing in that space you are inviting mildew & mold growth.

    Bookmark   August 28, 2008 at 9:58AM
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andrelaplume2

I probably did not explain this well.

When I would slide open the right door, the entire water meter will be exposed. There might be some stuff stored near it on a rolling storage unit that couldbe rolled out of the way providing an immediate 3 feet of access to the meter...6 feet if I popped both doors off.

The cleanout would be on the other end, again a full 3 feet of access if you slid the left door open.

If my closet idea is a bad one...what is suggested. The idea for the closet was as much to protect the cleanout/meter as it was to hide them. The cleanout sits higher than the floor and is a tripping hazard and the water meter hangs off the wall and is just waiting to get banged up by the kids. I figured building a wall on each side and adding some sliding doors between the two obstacles would protect each and allow for storage...just not sure how to inslulate the back (concrete wall)...which was the original question....perhaps nothing is needed for that 6 foot span except for some drylock....though I have never seen any water down there.

Either way the meter/cleanout should be encased in something...no?

PS:
I have never seen any mositure on the pipe going to the water meter...if I do I will put one of those foam wraps on it.

I am open to any and all ideas!

    Bookmark   August 28, 2008 at 10:44AM
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casey_wa

Maybe I misunderstood something here...but why is the water meter inside the house closet and not outside where it can be read by the meter reader?

Casey

"http://www.driverdb.com/Sean McDonagh"

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 1:28PM
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lazypup

Casey

In cold climates it is common practice to put the water meter inside the house where the water supply line enters the house and immediately in front of the house "Main Water Shutoff Valve".

In the past we had to allow the meter reader to enter the house once a month to read the meter, but now most meters have a digital sending unit attached to the analog meter. they then run a small cable like a telephone wire to a digital transducer mounted on the exterior wall of the house immediately outside the meter location. The meter reader now carries a digital electronic unit that when touched to the exterior transducer it automatically reads the meter.

In some areas they are now installing a digital sending unit that is attached to your home telephone line and they read your meter via a computer through your telephone line.

In my house both the watermeter and the gas meter are mounted in the basement and read via the telephone line.

    Bookmark   August 30, 2008 at 6:21PM
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casey_wa

Thanks lazypup...I learned something new today I did not know. Guess we are a little sheltered living in an area where we do not really have seasons. All we have a rain to sun then rain again.

Thanks, Casey

"http://www.driverdb.com/Sean McDonagh"

    Bookmark   August 31, 2008 at 2:25PM
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andrelaplume2

that is exactly right--they do not need to enter the home anymore. I wish the meter had been installed more towards the ceiling but its closer to the floor...so back to my question...see above....

    Bookmark   September 2, 2008 at 10:13AM
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noplacelikehome

I have had good luck keeping condensation down on incoming water lines by wrapping them in foam (As you would a hot water pipe). I would put the closet in, and if possible frame, insulate, vapor barrier and drywall behind everything. You don't want drywall directly against the foundation. So if you can't drywall behind it, it would probably be best to leave the concrete. Since you don't have a moisture issue, I don't see a need to seal the foundation.

    Bookmark   September 3, 2008 at 4:12AM
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